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The Web is Still a Thrilling Place

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When you get frustrated by the pressures of managing a website, look back five years. You’ve achieved a lot.

I meet many people who are discouraged by the performance of their websites. It seems that there are a whole range of things to be fixed. There is constant pressure to put stuff on the website-and particularly on the homepage-that doesn’t deserve to be there.

It’s difficult to get the attention of senior management, and even when they do pay attention they often lack a realistic perspective. Dealing with IT people can still be a pain, as they can still be obsessed with the technology itself. Old-style communicators just want to publish press releases, and, of course, there is no shortage of Flash-addicts among the marketing department.

It’s easy to develop a negative or overly critical attitude. I know that I have often fallen into this trap. It’s certainly easy for me to stand on top of the ditch and shout about what everyone is doing wrong. The theory of the perfect website is great but the reality of the trenches can drag you down.

But things are not that bad, really. If you’ve been working in the Web for the last five years or more, you have achieved an awful lot. Your website has matured immensely. And understanding of the real potential of the Web has grown steadily within your organization.

Because we’ve been led to believe that in this modern world, everything we want to happen must happen right now, we’ve become impatient. When big things like the Web happen they change our world in profound ways, but the change itself can often be slow and steady.

It’s almost 12 years since I chose the Web as my career. Back then I remember how awestruck I was at the very idea of a World Wide Web. You know, I still think the Web is this incredible, awesome thing. Sure, sometimes I get stuck in a rut, and I have to remind myself how lucky I am.

All of us who have been part of this journey have been part of something truly special. How often does anyone in your organization get even the smallest chance to change something within the organization? Your intranet can change the way staff work. Your public website can change the way customers feel about and interact with your organization.

We’re talking about big stuff here. Big change is never easy no matter how compelling the argument is. And it doesn’t happen quickly, nor should it. Because, at the end of the day, the change impacts how people work and live. People need time to adapt.

Most of those who wanted fast change and the fast buck have left the Web behind. The rest of us are left here for the long haul. We need to grind out progress, and that’s just fine. Grinding out a little bit of progress every year is something to be proud of.

It’ll take another 10 years for the Web to be truly integrated into society and industry. And that’s just fine.

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For your web content management solution, contact Gerry McGovern http://www.gerrymcgovern.com

Subscribe to his New Thinking Newsletter: subscribe@gerrymcgovern.mailer1.net

The Web is Still a Thrilling Place
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About Gerry McGovern
For your web content management solution, contact Gerry McGovern http://www.gerrymcgovern.com

Subscribe to his New Thinking Newsletter: subscribe@gerrymcgovern.mailer1.net WebProNews Writer
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