Health Issues Drive Online Connections

Nearly 20 percent (18%) of U.S. Internet users have gone online to find others with similar health issues, according to a new report from the Pew Internet & American Life Project.

The number increases to 23 percent among Internet users who are living with a chronic disease.

 

Pew-online-health

 

Republicans And Democrats

Nearly a quarter of Americans used Twitter or social networking sites such as Facebook or MySpace in the months leading up to the November, 2010 elections to connect to the campaign or election, according to a new report from the Pew Internet & American Life Project.

In contrast to the 2008 race—in which Democratic voters led the way in their use of online social networks for political purposes—Republican voters and supporters of the “Tea Party” movement caught up with Democrats in their use of social media in 2010.

 

Republicans And Democrats

Nearly a quarter of Americans used Twitter or social networking sites such as Facebook or MySpace in the months leading up to the November, 2010 elections to connect to the campaign or election, according to a new report from the Pew Internet & American Life Project.

In contrast to the 2008 race—in which Democratic voters led the way in their use of online social networks for political purposes—Republican voters and supporters of the “Tea Party” movement caught up with Democrats in their use of social media in 2010.

 

Republicans And Democrats

Nearly a quarter of Americans used Twitter or social networking sites such as Facebook or MySpace in the months leading up to the November, 2010 elections to connect to the campaign or election, according to a new report from the Pew Internet & American Life Project.

In contrast to the 2008 race—in which Democratic voters led the way in their use of online social networks for political purposes—Republican voters and supporters of the “Tea Party” movement caught up with Democrats in their use of social media in 2010.

 

Facebook And Twitter Users Are More Active In Groups

The majority (80%) of American Internet users participate in groups, compared with 56 percent of non-Internet users, according to a new report from the Pew Internet & American Life Project.

Social media users are even more likely to be active: 82% of social network users and 85% of Twitter users are group participants. 

 

Internet-Users-Groups

 

Wikipedia Marks Tenth Anniversary

To mark the 10th anniversary of Wikipedia that takes place Saturday, the Pew Internet & American Life Project has released data about who uses the site and how its audience has grown over the years.

The percentage of all American adults who use Wikipedia to look for information has increased from 25% in February 2007 to 42% in May 2010. This translates to 53% of adult internet users.

Location-Based Services See Light Use

Four percent of online adults use a service such as Foursquare or Gowalla that allows them to share their location with friends and to find others who are in their area, according to a new report form the Pew Internet & American Life Project.

Location-based services such as Foursquare or Gowalla are significantly more popular with younger internet users; eight percent of online adults ages 18-29 use location-based services, significantly more than online adults in any other age group.

More Than Half Of Americans Do Online Research Before Making A Purchase

More than half (58%) of Americans conduct online research about the products and services they are considering purchasing, according to a new report from the Pew Internet & American Life Project.

Mobile Apps Often Go Unused

More than a third (35%) of U.S. adults have applications or “apps” on their phones, yet only 24 percent of adults use those apps, according to a new report from the Pew Internet & American Life Project.

Many adults who have apps on their phones, particularly older adults, do not use them, and 11 percent of cell owners are not sure if their phone has apps.

 

Pew-Apps

 

Americans Have A Love-Hate Relationship With Their Cell Phones

Texting by American adults has increased significantly over the past year, but still does not approach the level of text messages exchanged by young people, according to a new report from Pew Internet & American Life Project.

Nearly three quarters (72%) of adult cell phone users send and receive text messages now, up from 65 percent in September 2009. The majority (87%) of teen cell users text. Teens text 50 messages a day on average, five times more than the typical 10 text messages sent and received by adults per day.