All Posts Tagged Tag: ‘Health’

Drinkable Sunscreen Sounds Like BS

“Ladies and gentlemen of the class of ’99 … wear sunscreen. If I could offer you one tip for the future, sunscreen would be it.” It’s not April 1st. Just checking. The Daily Mail reported on something that sounds like, if not utter bull crap, certainly a really bad idea. It’s called “drinkable sunscreen”, which is at the very least …

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HSS Selects IT Certification Program Accreditor

The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) Office of the National Coordinator for Health Information Technology (ONC) recently selected the American National Standards Institute (ANSI) for a second three-year term as the ONC-Approved Accreditor (ONC-AA) for theONC Health Information Technology (HIT) Certification Program. The program was once known as the Permanent Certification Program for Health Information Technology. The …

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Retinol Creams And Wine For Cellulite And Lines

This beautiful spring weather is nearly intoxicating after a winter spent dashing from car doors to buildings to avoid rapid onset frostbite. But with the carefree feeling of higher temps, come the tee shirts and shorts which cruelly expose our lapse of a rigid fitness regime for a few of the colder months. Likewise, our dry wintry skin may have …

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Juicers Not Going Away, Actually Grow More Popular

Juicers and blenders are becoming more and more popular as the weather warms up and the swimsuits lurk menacingly in the back of the drawer, awaiting their time in the sun. Those who are looking to take off what’s left of the winter weight, as well as those who are getting into “juicing” for the health benefits will be happy …

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Ebola Virus Survivors Face Stigma

The Ebola outbreak in West Africa has infected more than 240 people so far, and has been fatal to over 145. Ebola results in death in 68% of all cases, though at times those who survive recover quickly and completely. Yet, survivors still face the challenge of social stigma in their communities, regardless of being completely healthy and free of …

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MERS Virus Surge Seen in the Middle East

In 2012, the world was first exposed to the Middle East Respiratory Syndrome virus, better known as MERS. The virus originated in Saudi Arabia, and all evidence suggests that only six Middle Eastern countries have been noted spots of origination for the virus. Despite the limited proximity of origins, however, the worldwide health and scientific communities are constantly monitoring the …

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Samoa Pink Eye Outbreak Extends School Closings

An outbreak of conjunctivitis, more commonly known as pink eye, has prompted the South Pacific U.S. unincorporated territory of American Samoa to keep most of its schools closed through the week. At least 2,400 students and teachers have contracted the highly contagious disease, which has also cancelled flights and interrupted court proceedings. Conjunctivitis is an inflammation of the outermost layer …

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Less Screen Time Could Leave Children Healthier

It’s been known for decades now that couch potatoes tend to be less healthy than their more active peers. With content moving onto mobile devices, however, it is unclear whether the same link will be maintained for kids and adults who consumer media on-the-go. A new study published this week in JAMA Pediatrics suggests that no matter what entertainment is …

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Aspirin Doesn’t Prevent Pregnancy Loss, Shows Study

It is common in the U.S. for doctors to prescribe low doses of aspirin for prospective mothers who have had a previous pregnancy loss. This is despite the fact that aspirin therapy has not been proven to increase the likelihood of viable pregnancies. The idea is that increased blood flow to the uterus might help pregnancies that would otherwise be …

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Vitamin D Supplements May Help Prevent Heart Disease

Vitamin D is once again in the hot spot; for some reason the scientists have decided to pick on this vitamin recently. While studies have claimed that vitamin D is not all that great as people once thought was, there have been other studies proclaiming that vitamin D is indeed all that, and more. The studies this year have discovered …

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Alzheimer’s May Be Predicted by Brain Plaques

According to a new study conducted by Duke Medicine, brain scans using radioactive dye may help to predict an impending development of Alzheimer’s disease, as well as future cognitive decline in otherwise healthy adults. In an article published in the online journal Molecular Psychiatry, researchers revealed that identification of residue that forms in the brain called silent beta-amyloid plaque could …

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Cholesterol Drug by Amgen Cuts LDL by 60%

A new class of experimental drugs have been proven to dramatically lower cholesterol, and may become a viable option for the 70 million Americans who have high LDL (low-density lipoprotein) or “bad” cholesterol. One of these new medicines, Amgen’s Evolocumab, cut cholesterol by 55 to 66 percent compared to a placebo in some studies. The new cholesterol drugs might serve …

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