ICANN Introduces The First Four New gTLDs

Over the last two years, the internet Corporation for Assigned Names and Numbers has been trying to introduce new generic Top-Level Domains to the Internet. The process was initially wracked by technical issues, but everyone from Apple to Google were…

ICANN Says Amazon Can’t Own .Amazon Domain Name

ICANN finally wrapped up the application process for new generic top level domain names last year. The results of which are still far from over, however, as the nonprofit now has to sort through all the applications and decide who…

Will The Next Xbox Be Called The Xbox Fusion?

It’s pretty much a given that the next Xbox won’t be called the Xbox 720. As for the actual name, we just don’t know yet. Some have speculated that it would be called the Xbox 8 or Xbox Infinity, but…

Is Xbox 8 The Next Xbox Or Just A Windows Tie-In?

We’ve been hearing on and off again rumors about the next Xbox and what it’s going to entail. We first got word that its codename is “Durango” at Microsoft and then a leaked document confirmed much of what we had…

ICANN Finally Accepting gTLDs Applications Again

It’s been a long and arduous road for ICANN since last month when their application system for new generic top-level domains went down due to a software glitch. The glitch allowed applicants to see each other’s usernames and file names.…

.Pirate Now Available As A Domain Name

ICANN might be the “official” administrator of top-level domain names. They give out all the .com, .net, .org and other well known domains to all the Web sites you know and love. There are alternatives, however, and one of the…

Google Wins 750 Domains in Cybersquatting Case

The National Arbitration Forum (NAF) has awarded Google the rights to over 750 domain names that a cybersquatter had purchased and tied to other known brands and celebrity names. Between February 29 and March 10 of this year, defendant Chris…

What ICANN Should Do To Rebuild Trust After Security Breach

During what was supposed to be the exciting early stages of an Internet domain name “revolution,” ICANN is finding itself in a heap of controversy over its new generic top-level domain program. In January, the Internet Corporation for Assigned Names…

ANA on ICANN’s Expansion of Top-Level Domains: “Reckless and Premature”

On January 12, ICANN began carrying out its controversial new plan. As WebProNews previously reported, the organization made the historical decision last year to expand the number of generic top-level domain (gTLD) names to an unlimited number. What this means is that the 22 domain name endings, including .com, .org, and others that currently exist could turn into .brand going forward.

Should ICANN Overturn “.brand” Domain Plans? Advertisers Think So.

In June, Internet Corporation for Assigned Names and Numbers (ICANN) made a historic move to open domain name endings beyond the 20 or so that currently exist to an unlimited number. This means that the .com, .net, .org, and others that consumers are familiar with could turn into .brand in the near future.

Farm Bureau Hints Facebook Paid $8.5M For FB.com

Farmers and ranchers with ties to the American Farm Bureau Federation may want to call the nonprofit and see if it happens to be doing anything special.  Farm Bureau should have more than a few dollars to spare, since it turns out the sale of FB.com to Facebook probably netted it around $8.5 million.

As you might remember, the transaction was announced in November, and Mark Zuckerberg made it sound rather insignificant (and funny) by stating, "The Farm Bureau has agreed to give us FB.com and we in return have agreed to not sell farm subsidies."

FTC Shuts Down Domain Name Scammers

The Federal Trade Commission said today it has shut down the operations of Canadian con artists who allegedly acted as domain name registrars and convinced thousands of U.S. consumers to pay bogus bills by making them believe they would lose their website addresses unless they paid.

Yahoo Takes Control Of Flicker.com

Typo-prone photographers appear to owe Yahoo a "thank you."  After making at least one generous offer and then resorting to a lawsuit, the company’s acquired Flicker.com, presumably for the sake of saving people who misspell "Flickr" from visiting the wrong site.

Yahoo Buys Me.me Domain Name For Social Brand

Yahoo’s acquired a new domain name, and while we don’t expect that Facebook and Twitter are quaking in fear, there’s reason to believe it’ll play a significant role in Yahoo’s "social" future.  The Me.me domain name will, naturally enough, tie in to Yahoo’s microblogging site, Meme.

Meme has been described as a Twitter clone with random references to dogs instead of birds.  Otherwise, it’s attracted very little attention at all.

How Important is Your Domain Name to Your Brand?

How important is your domain name to you brand? Most online businesses would probably consider it to be quite important, and with good reason. Sometimes before searching, customers may simply opt to go to the "yourbrandhere.com" URL simply because it makes sense. Now, sometimes that URL is already taken, and for start-ups, that’s something to consider in itself.

Controversial Gambling Domain Seizure Ruling Expected This Month

Back in 2008, Kentucky Governor Steve Beshear announced that he wanted to shut down 141 Internet gambling sites in the state in an effort to stop unregulated online gaming. He filed a civil suit against the domain names and asked the court to force the sites to block access to Kentucky users or give up control of their domain names.

Google Loses Domain Name Dispute

Google’s empire hasn’t exactly crumbled, and to be honest, the average person will probably never even realize what’s happened.  But what’s happened is this: for just the second time in its history, Google’s lost a domain name dispute.

Google submitted a complaint about a site called Groovle to the National Arbitration Forum (which ICANN lets decide domain name disputes) on November 6th of this year.  The search giant argued that Groovle is "nearly identical or confusingly similar" to its own name.