All Posts Tagged Tag: ‘Journal of the American Medical Association’

Insulin Pump Sensors Reduce Hypoglycemia, Shows Study

A new study published today in The Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA) shows that certain sensors on insulin pumps can significantly decrease hypoglycemic episodes in those with type 1 diabetes. The sensors in question detect when blood sugar falls below a certain level, then cuts off insulin delivery. The study looked at 95 type 1 diabetes patients from …

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U.S. Falling Behind on Health Outcomes, Shows Study

Though it hosts the best medical research in the world and spends more money on healthcare than any other country, a new study shows that the U.S. is falling behind other countries when it comes to actual health outcomes. The study shows that traffic injuries, self-harm, cirrhosis, and drug addiction are rising as causes of premature death, along with Alzheimer’s, …

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Obesity Linked to Increased Death Risks

Obesity has already been tied to a wide range of health problems, including cognitive decline. Now, a new study published recently in The Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA) shows that people who are severely obese are at a higher risk of death. “Estimates of the relative mortality risks associated with normal weight, overweight, and obesity may help to …

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Cancer Sample Handling Changes Called For By Doctors

In a column appearing this week in the Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA), doctors have called on the medical community to change the way it handles cancer tissue samples. At issue is the rise of new gene sequencing technology, which traditional sample handling practices impede by damaging DNA. “Deciding how best to obtain (tumor) samples and how best …

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Migraines Linked to More Brain Lesions Among Women

A new study shows that women who experience migraines have shown a higher prevalence and greater increase in deep white matter hyperintensities (brain lesions) than those who do not. However, the number, frequency, and severity of the migraines the women experienced were not associated with lesion progression. The study, published this week in the Journal of the American Medical Association, …

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Heart Disease Risks Higher, But Varied For Hispanics/Latinos

A new study shows that heart disease risk factors, such as high colesterol and obesity, are far higher for U.S. Hispanic/Latino adults than for the general U.S. population. However, the results also show that those risk factors vary greatly for Hispanics and Latinos of different backgrounds. The Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos (HCHS/SOL), funded by the National Institutes of …

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Multivitamins Don’t Reduce Heart Disease Risk, Says Study

A new study has found that daily multivitamin use does not reduce the risk of cardiovascular disease in men. The findings were presented this week at the American Heart Association’s Scientific Sessions 2012 and published in The Journal of the American Medical Association. A similar study last month did find that multivitamins can reduce the risk of cancer in men …

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Cholesterol Levels Dropping Among Americans, Study Says

While Americans continue to grow obese, a new analysis of U.S. health data shows that between 1988 and 2010, average cholesterol levels for U.S. adults have been declining. The study, published this week in The Journal of the American Medical Association, shows that low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C), non-high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C), and total cholesterol (TC) have declined over the past …

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BPA Levels Found to be Higher in Obese Children

A new study published today in the Journal of the American Medical Association shows that children and adolescents who had higher concentrations of bisphenol A (BPA) in their urine also had significantly increased odds of being obese. The study looked at a nationally representative sample of around 3,000 children and adolescents of ages 6 to 19. BPA is a manufactured …

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