Quantcast

Shark Photobombs Two Boys at Manhattan Beach

Get the WebProNews Newsletter:


[ Life]

The photobomb trend is nothing new–everyone from friends, strangers and even celebrities have been known to get in a picture right before it was taken, effectively ruining it. While photobombs can be annoying (and sometimes funny), at least they don’t usually send cold chills up your spine right? A woman from Manhattan Beach, California got quite the surprise when she discovered that a shark photobombed a snapshot of her boys playing in the ocean.

June Emerson took her twin 12-year-old boys to Manhattan Beach on Friday. After looking through her pictures, she noticed something lurking near the boys. “I’m not sure what it was, but it definitely scared me when I thought it might be a shark,” Emerson said. “Many local surfers and lifeguards have seen this and believe it to be a shark.”

Rather than tell her boys that a shark was so close to them while they were in the water, Emerson decided to tell them that the creature in the photo was a dolphin. “Of course, I told my kids it was dolphin, as we live at the beach and are in the waters here almost daily.” Now that the shark photobomb story has gone viral, it’s not likely that Emerson will be able to keep that story afloat for long.

Check out the shark photobomb picture below.

[timeout]

[/timeout]

Some people believe the shark in the photo was a Great White (cue the Jaws music). Great White sharks have been spotted close to the Manhattan Beach shore before, but it hasn’t been confirmed that the shark in the photo was of the Jaws variety.

While the photo might scare some people out of getting in the ocean for a while, most sharks don’t attack humans. According to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), “sharks rarely ever attack humans and would much rather feed on fish and marine mammals.” The NOAA also notes that most shark attacks occur when the shark is “confused or curious.”

Image via KTLA

Shark Photobombs Two Boys at Manhattan Beach
Top Rated White Papers and Resources
  • Tommy

    I’ve studied wildlife all my life. With a particular focus in the avian field having nearly 30yrs of experience dealing with both wild & exotic pet species. So i’d like to think i have a “good eye” for spotting various animals etc…especially with the difficulty in spotting birds when in the field. And this picture to me clearly looks like a Bottlenose Dolphin. Not only with the horizontal tail fluke but also the pectoral fins look smaller than a White Shark’s would be. Dolphins by nature love playing and that’s probably 9 out of 10 what this animal was trying to do. However, that doesn’t leave one “safe” just because it’s a Dolphin. Trust me folks, the wild ones don’t act like “Flipper” and can be quite aggressive when they want to particularly the males if they see you as a threat or competition towards a female. Just do a search on YouTube for “aggressive dolphins” and you’ll quickly see what i’m talking about. These animals do in fact have teeth and can inflict damage if they wanted to with ease. So one should always be cautious when ANYTHING approaches you in an environment were not made to be in…(g)

  • Join for Access to Our Exclusive Web Tools
  • Sign Up For The Free Newsletter