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More Backlash From Google’s New Privacy Policy

Lawmakers demand a probe into Google

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More Backlash From Google’s New Privacy Policy
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More concern over Google’s announcement of new privacy policies, this time from prominent lawmaker Edward Markey. He’s demanding a probe into Google’s management of consumer data.

This comes after yesterday’s issuance of a letter to Google from a group of lawmaker’s demanding clarification about consumer’s rights under the new policies.

Markey Google+%289to5+Google+-+Beyond+Good+and+Evil%29″>demands that the Federal Communications Commission investigate further what options users will have in regard to how their personal information can be managed:

“…All consumers should have the right to say no to sharing of their personal information, particularly when young people are involved. Google’s new privacy policy should enable consumers to opt-out if they don’t want their use of YouTube to morph into YouTrack.”

“Consumers – not corporations – should have control over their own personal information, especially for children and teens. I plan to ask the Federal Trade Commission whether Google’s planned changes to its privacy policy violate Google’s recent settlement with the agency.”

A blog post from Google Policy Manager Betsy Masiello addressed just that issue on Thursday:

“We’re not collecting more data about you. Our new policy simply makes it clear that we use data to refine and improve your experience on Google.”

So we will have to wait to see what the response will be from Google on whether user’s can opt-out of these policies or if there is control over what is done with our personal information. Google has already responded to related inquires about changes to Government and enterprise services offered at Google and if they would be affected by the new policies.

More Backlash From Google’s New Privacy Policy
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  • Deef Fourjay

    PLURALS do not require apostrophes, illiterate!
    (“lawmaker’s” “user’s”)

    • Larry Stookey

      Truly, the misuse of apostrophes is one of my pet peeves as a teacher. One of my other pet peeves is name-calling. I’m aware that most comment areas on the Internet are rife with flaming, derogatory epithets. However, it’s (the apostrophe is OK here) entirely possible to call someone’s (OK here too) attention to a mistake they’ve made without calling them names. In this latter case, the response is often, “Oh, ‘duh’ ” instead of “Wow! What planet was THAT person born on?”

  • J S

    If it’s plural, it doesn’t need an apostrophe!