King-Size Candy Bars Are Dead, Long Live The King

By: Toni Matthews-El - June 22, 2014

In recent years, many popular snacks have become smaller in size. Though it may have been more about money than health.

For Mars Inc., the decision to do away with “king-size” items is all about health and nutrition. The candy company, which makes M&Ms, Twix, and Snickers among others, has said that it intends to stop selling products that contain more than 250 calories per serving.

According to the Chicago Tribune, the initiative was laid out in 2012 with plans to stop shipping out the king-size version of their popular candies by the end of 2013.

Their king-size candies were probably never meant to be consumed all at once or even all by one person. But for those who did, they were taking in a whopping 510 calories with the king-size Snickers bar alone.

That’s more than ¼ the average calories a person is expected to eat in an entire day!

Calories aren’t the only concern for Mars. The company also intends to cut back on sodium levels by as much as 25 percent by 2015.

“Mars has a broad-based commitment to health and nutrition,” said the company in a statement. They added that this commitment “includes a number of global initiatives.”

Perhaps that initiative will be to be mindful of the serving sizes made available to customers. The soon to be defunct king-size Snickers only had a serving size of ⅓ the entire product. Let’s be honest: Exactly how many people break or cut off a third of a candy bar in order to be “calorie conscious?”

It may be up to Mars to simply sell their products in portions more agreeable with what’s healthiest for consumers rather than trust these persons to always check the portions and serving sizes.

A big question with regard to this change has got to come down to the pricing.

As I said, it’s not beyond companies to shrink their serving sizes but raise their prices to make a profit.

While Mars Inc.’s aim may be noble, if prices on the tinier versions of their chocolate go up, people may pass on their candy for reasons having nothing to do with health.

Image via Wikimedia Commons

About the Author

Toni Matthews-ElToni Matthews-El hails from the land of chunked pumpkins and people who come to a complete stop before making any and every turn. When she isn't contributing articles to WebProNews, she spends her time freelance writing, cheering Liverpool FC, and enjoying life as a hair flower connoisseur. Disclaimer: Written opinions do not necessarily reflect that of WebProNews or its affiliates

View all posts by Toni Matthews-El
  • The Candyman

    Mars owns the trademark for “fun size” candy although other candy companies are using it…I know that if our small candy company were doing this we would already had a letter from them..

    • The Traveler

      I don’t think you can own a trademark on a quantity. They own the term “fun size”, but anyone can have the same size (number of grams, ounces, etc.) and call it something else. Snack size, healthy size, perfect portion, maybe even create a size to coincide with phases of life: child, teen, adult. In Europe, they have another measurement: energy.

  • c h

    Doesn’t matter to me.I haven’t eaten a mars product since they put that queerAss snickers commercial in the Super Bowl.