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Rupert Murdoch Articles

Do You Have the “Right” to Link?
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It was recently discovered that search engine/news aggregator NewsNow.co.uk had been blocked by Times Online, a publication from News International, a subsidiary of News Corp. This has been viewed as a possible beginning to what News Corp. CEO Rupert Murdoch has been talking about for quite some time – blocking search engines and aggregators from using its content (and using apparently includes linking).

News Corp. Blocks Content from News Aggregation Site
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As you may recall, News Corp. CEO Rupert Murdoch began talking about blocking search engines and news aggregators a couple months ago. This escalated discussions that have essentially been going on for over a decade about the online news industry and fair use.

Minds of the Media Gather to Discuss Future of News

The Federal Trade Commission (FTC) is hosting a 2-day workshop on "Journalism and the Internet Age" today and tomorrow. Featured at the event are a number of high profile media executives and gurus. The cast ranges from News Corp. CEO Rupert Murdoch to Huffington Post co-founder Arianna Huffington.

80% of Consumers Would Not Pay For Content
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As you’ve more than likely heard by now, News Corp. CEO Rupert Murdoch in an interview last week talked about the possibility of blocking search engines from indexing News Corp. publications’ content. While this may or may not actually happen, it is one of the latest (and biggest) examples of a publisher taking the position of search engines hurting them rather than helping them.

Murdoch On Blocking Search Engines: “I Think We Will”
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There’s a chance that the content produced by the Wall Street Journal, the New York Post, and a number of other important organizations will soon become impossible to find using Google.  Rupert Murdoch indicated in a recent interview that News Corp. may block search engines.

Google Okay With Blocking News Corp.
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In a recent interview we wrote about this morning, Rupert Murdoch indicated that News Corp. may block search engines from indexing its sites.  Now, it doesn’t exactly look like Google’s going to offer money to him (or throw a fit) in response, as the search giant’s more or less replied by saying "fine."

The Traffic News Corp. Would Lose Without Google
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As you may know, Rupert Murdoch, Chairman and CEO of News Corp., is saying he may block search engines from accessing the organization’s content. He expressed this notion in a recent interview.

If Murdoch were to act upon this, it would mean theoretically that you would no longer be able to find Wall Street Journal, New York Post, etc. content on Google. Of course that would be in a world where scraped content isn’t frequently crawled by search engines.

MySpace To Miss $100 Million From Google Search Deal
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Way back in 2006, MySpace and Google signed a three-year deal that was supposed to have the search giant become the social network’s exclusive search provider in exchange for $900 million.  Now, unfortunately for MySpace, around $100 million of that amount isn’t going to change hands.

MySpace, Bebo Not For Sale
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It looks like two significant social networks aren’t going to change hands anytime soon.  Executives representing News Corp and AOL have, with different degrees of forcefulness, expressed their intentions to retain possession of MySpace and Bebo, respectively. 

Murdoch Says Newspapers Must Charge For Online Content
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News Corp. chief executive Rupert Murdoch said on Thursday that newspapers must find a way to charge for online content to make up for declining ad revenue.

"People are used to reading everything on the net for free, and that’s going to have to change," Murdoch told attendees at the annual Cable Show event in Washington, D.C.

Murdoch cited The New York Times as an example, saying it has a "very, very good Web site." He said he did not believe the paper would make any money online unless it changes its current business model.

News Corp Posts Disappointing Financial Results
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There’s no escaping it: News Corp had a rough quarter.  Rupert Murdoch thinks times will be tough for a while, too.  But even as the media giant posted some bad numbers, it turned out that at least a couple of its online properties are working well, with MySpace and WSJ.com making impressive amounts of money.

Online Journal Revenue Set To Increase

Rupert Murdoch said yesterday that online subscription revenue at The Wall Street Journal and Dow Jones could increase by $300 million a year up to the next three years.

The News Corp Chief Executive was speaking at Goldman Sachs’ Communacopia press conference in New York said he dropped his plan to make the WSJ.com a free and open site after seeing the revenue projections.

Digital Revenue Becoming More Important To Dow Jones
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Dow Jones is about as old a company as you’re likely to run into; founded in 1882, it makes at least a couple of countries look young.  It’s staying with the times, though, as Rupert Murdoch expects considerably more than half of its revenue will soon come from digital undertakings.

MySpace Experiencing Ad-Related Revenue Difficulties

The good news, from News Corp’s perspective, is that MySpace is continuing to grow.  The bad news is that profiting off social ads is tougher than the corporation had expected.

News Corp Considering Yahoo Deal

Rupert Murdoch may end up part of Steve Ballmer’s bid to bring Yahoo into the Microsoft fold, depending on how the deal progresses.

Murdoch May Make Wall Street Journal Free
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An online-only subscription to the Wall Street Journal usually costs $99, and around 1 million people have judged that to be a reasonable price.  Look for some drastic shifts, though, as Rupert Murdoch intends to lower that first number and increase the second.

MySpace Founders Stick With Murdoch

The term “ridiculously wealthy” may still apply, but MySpace founders Chris DeWolfe and Tom Anderson have renewed their contracts with News Corp., and reports indicate that the pair won’t become quite as rich as they might have wanted.

Murdoch: Free WSJ.com Won’t Hurt Paper

Making the Wall Street Journal’s online subscription model go the way of the dodo could boost the paper’s Internet readership, along with its revenue.

Dow Jones Denies News Corp. Buyout

A report from British news site The Business that Dow Jones had officially been sold to Rupert Murdoch is being called untrue by spokespersons for both the Bancroft family, which owns Dow Jones.

Rumor: MySpace Swap For Yahoo Stake
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News Corp could be offering Jerry Yang a deal where they would trade MySpace in exchange for a stake in Yahoo.

Murdoch Would Bolster WSJ’s Digital Presence

The letter has it all – bold print, bullet points, and italics.  It’s 1,200 words long.  And it’s signed by billionaire Rupert Murdoch.  That’s right – Murdoch’s most recent communication regarding a Dow Jones takeover has been published by The Wall Street Journal, a Dow Jones property.

Which may not have been what the billionaire intended.  “We are disappointed, as I imagine you are, that the details of our proposal and the discussion of the merits of a potential combination have become a matter of public debate,” he wrote to the Bancroft family (which owns Dow Jones).  Yet the letter was unfailingly courteous, and modesty ruled the day.