‘Stoning Adulterers’ May Become Afghan Punishment

    November 25, 2013

Warning: Graphic Content in Video Below.

Against public outcry (both inside and outside of Afghanistan) governmental representatives for the country are considering reinstating a punishment that many would like to see relegated to the history books under topics such as “cruel and unusual punishments” and “tortures of the past” in spite of the fact that other countries practice these forms of punishment. Afghanistan is now reviewing propositions to bring stoning back as a form of punishment for adulterers.

According to the Asia director for Human Rights Watch, Brad Adams, “It is absolutely shocking that 12 years after the fall of the Taliban government, the Karzai administration might bring back stoning as a punishment.”

While many people in developed, civilized countries will admit that the inhumane option to stone another person does sound “shocking” this is only one of the possibilities. Unfortunately, other potential options sound nearly as Medieval as stoning, such as flogging.


The Guardian claims that public stoning may be considered and references a globally-undisclosed draft abstracted from an Afghan legal document that proposes penal revisions, which are presently being reviewed by the ministry of justice. Article 21 of the document states, “Men and women who commit adultery shall be punished based on the circumstances to one of the following punishments: lashing, stoning [to death].”

Many see the recent considerations as barbaric and steps of a society regressing to more primitive time periods.

Brad Adams said, “President Karzai needs to demonstrate at least a basic commitment to human rights and reject this proposal out of hand.” However, deeper concerns have arisen about wasted resources originating from continued military efforts from outside countries (such as the United States) to instill a peaceful regime in Afghanistan since 2001. Public disgust is being vocalized in the midst of these recent penal propositions that seek to use physical tortures as methods for punishing crimes.

[Image Via Wikimedia Commons]