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Wall Street Journal Articles

WSJ Sets Guidelines For Employee Use Of Social Media

 

Wall Street Journal Gives Employees Social Media Rules
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We’ve seen newspaper publishers forbid employees from accessing social networks before. The Wall Street Journal is not restricting access, but they are restricting how social networks are used by their employees.

Will Micropayments Work for the Wall Street Journal?
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The Wall Street Journal Online will reportedly be launching a micropayment model for content this fall. Some other news publications appear to see this is a brilliant move, but asking people to pay for content on the web will draw its share of skepticism.

WSJ Managing Editor Robert Thomson says, "It’s a payments system — once we have your details we will be able to charge you according to what you read, in particular, a high price for specialist material."

Old Figures Being Used For Marketing Reports
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 As I looked through the 

Big Publishers Want Special Treatment from Google
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Update: In an interesting turn to this story, the New York Times has eliminated 993,000 article pages as it rolls International Herald Tribune (IHT) into the NYT site. Instead of redirecting the articles to the same article on NYT, they all simply go now to one landing page.

More Confirmation of Paid Twitter Accounts
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Biz StoneYou’ve heard endless rumors, speculation, and theories as to how Twitter will monetize itself. Biz Stone has now confirmed Twitter will be launching its own fee-based services this year after watching others make money of Twitter themselves. The Wall Street Journal Reports:

The True State Of Online Advertising, If There Is One

If you would just read the last post I did you would see a report that touted the continued growth of online marketing despite the economy as reported by CMO’s of 518 companies. That’s so yesterday though. As reported in the Wall Street Journal, Market Research Group IDC reports a different point of view. Or is it?

Too Much Content Bad for Online Advertising?
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Could the enormous amount of content on the web be hurting online advertising revenue? That is exactly what is happening according to the Wall Street Journal.

The largest contributor to this is probably user-generated content. With everyone and their mother pushing out content (like the incredible number of videos of some guy playing guitar in his room on YouTube) with incredible frequency, the market is becoming saturated.

News Corp Bleeding Revenue Going Into 2009

Newspapers and traditional media are bleeding profits and jobs. It’s one of the hardest hit sectors, so it’s not as if they couldn’t see this coming. But News Corp’s CEO Rupert Murdoch says it’s even worse than he thought. The company just announced they are writing off $8.4 billion of losses.

Is Google Secretly Anti-Net Neutrality?
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The Wall Street Journal has created a ton of Internet buzz, but not in a good way. In what now appears to have been a slam against Google, Barack Obama, and Network Neutrality, there are misrepresentations, misquotes, and pure fabrications seemingly tailored toward a desired end: create the appearance Net Neutrality is losing its most important supporters.

Should Online Newspaper Content Be Free?
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Shane RichmondShane Richmond writing at Telegraph.co.uk has an interesting piece up about whether or not online newspaper content should be free.

iTunes Killing The Album? Or Is It White Noise?

 From the Billboard to The Wall Street Journal, the debate rages on. Has iTunes killed the album? Would Kid Rock have sold more or less if he’d gone on iTunes. (LESS) Was Atlantic smart to pull the Estelle single off iTunes just as it was climbing the chart?

Oops: WSJ.com Ad Calls McCain Win Before Debate
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This morning, before Senator John McCain even agreed to attend tonight’s debate, a Web ad paid for by the McCain campaign appeared alongside a Wall Street Journal article boldly declaring him the winner. The foreign policy debate with Barack Obama isn’t scheduled until 9 p.m. tonight.

WSJ.com Launches Redesign
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The Wall Street Journal will introduce a new redesign to its Web site WSJ.com on Tuesday that will offer more social networking features and improved navigation.

The Journal Community will allow the company’s 1 million or so paid subscribers to comment on articles, ask experts questions, and join discussion groups.

Wall Street Journal Stabs At Net Neutrality
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It’s interesting, but not surprising, FCC Chairman Kevin Martin is the target of a scathing editorial by the Wall Street Journal. He’s an easy and popular target these days from both sides of just about any issue involving the FCC. He stinks. Everybody knows it.

Conducting A Successful Webcast

That’s probably one of the stranger headlines the Wall Street Journal has run. Dana Mattioli has an article in Tuesday’s Wall Street Journal where she lists some of the ways people get in trouble on webcasts and webinars.

Facebook, Wall Street Journal Partner

When the New York Times introduced a Facebook app, we were suspicious, but the thing did surprisingly well.  Now, in what’s even more of a stretch, the Wall Street Journal and Facebook have also shaken hands.

Microsoft Grabs WSJ Search Ad Deal

Unlike another well-known News Corp property, MySpace, the Wall Street Journal opened its search advertising opportunity to Microsoft.

Wall Street Journal Picks Microsoft
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Microsoft will be providing the contextual and search advertising to the Wall Street Journal Digital Network, which includes The Wall Street Journal Online, Barrons.com, MarketWatch, and AllThingsD.com.

For Microsoft, that means the Beast of Redmond can add 20 million visitors per month to its advertising network.

Money for Content
The WSJ let the "our content will be free" story spread for months to generate public relations related coverage and to misdirect competitors before announcing that they are going to keep their subscription service:

Mr. Murdoch made his latest comments at the World Economic Forum in Davos, Switzerland, in answering a question.

WSJ Will Not Abandon Subscription Model

If rumors are to be believed, the Wall Street Journal has been considering abandoning the subscription model for months.

But alas, it’s not to be. Rupert Murdoch announced today that the Wall Street Journal, while expanding its free offerings, would not leave the subscription model. In fact, he stated that:

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