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Rachel Canning: Teen Sues Parents Who Spoiled Her

    March 5, 2014
    Toni Matthews-El
    Comments are off for this post.

Rachel Canning thought being an adult meant she could do whatever she wanted and somehow her parents were just going to foot the bill.

As many actual adults know, this is hardly how reality works. Canning learned this lesson the hard way when she decided to sue her parents.

According to Canning’s version of events, her parents kicked her out once she hit 18 years of age, stopped paying for her Catholic high school tuition, and are also refusing to foot the bill for college.

Canning’s parents, Sean and Elizabeth, are telling a different story. They say they didn’t kick their 18-year-old daughter out; she left voluntarily because she didn’t want to obey the “house rules”. This meant a curfew and helping out around the house.

Canning had no interest in making her own way in the world as a grown up, still seeing her survival as her parent’s obligation to fund well into adulthood. She hired a lawyer to sue her parents in an effort to force them to pay for her schooling and provide her hundreds of dollars per week to live off.

It either never occurred to her or she flat out refused to consider either seeking grants and loans for schooling and finding a job to support herself.

The highly bizarre case was brought to court in Morristown, N.J.where a judge ruled on Tuesday that Canning’s parents do not have to pay her high school tuition.

The judge delayed ruling on the matter of college and asked whether or not it was wise to try and set precedent regarding house rules for adult children living at home.

The case will not be settled until April 22nd.

In the meantime, the internet has already begun to weigh in on the matter. Popular consensus among social media is that Sarah Canning is a “spoiled brat” trying to mooch off of her parents while disrespecting them in their own house. Here are just a few opinions that came down the pipe via Twitter:

Canning’s behavior is that of a teenage girl who clearly has never had to fend for herself. She’s someone who would rather sue her parents to pay her way in the world than consider the reality that people younger than her must do so every single day.

Being an adult, as Canning is learning, is more than “I can do what I want”: It means you have to pay for things. Speaking of which…where is she going to get the money to pay her legal fees should she lose the case?

Image via Youtube


  • smithsson

    your fellow staffer Lacy Langley had asked hit the nail on the head with a more interesting question:

    “What do you think? Is this the latest manifestation of the “entitlement
    generation” or do you believe that Rachel Canning deserves to have her
    family’s financial support?”

    the relevance of this question begs one to ponder to ask that a generation of social media and an abundance of consumer business models based on offering services & information for free, leads one to wonder if the social responsibility has become passe, or passively perceived as someone else’s problem?