Missing Jet: Third “Ping” Brings New Hope?

By: Lacy Langley - April 6, 2014

The missing jet, Malaysian Flight MH370, could possibly be closer to being found after a third “ping” was detected on Sunday that could possibly be signals from the plane’s black box, according to AP.

The first of these pings was heard on Friday, then another on Saturday. All three have been heard in a small precinct in a very large (88,000 square mile) search area.

The second was heard only about 1.5 miles from the first and heard for about 90 seconds. There were also sightings of white debris floating in the ocean in that same area.

When the first ping, and even the second, were heard, enthusiasm was cautiously curbed. The pings did have the correct frequency to be a black box signal, which was created to stand out from all ocean marine life, but optimism has been discouraged.

“This is an important and encouraging lead, but one which I urge you to treat carefully,” stated “retired Australian Air Chief Marshall Angus Houston, who is coordinating the search from Perth, Australia.

“We have an acoustic event. The job now is to determine the significance of that event. It does not confirm or deny the presence of the aircraft locator on the bottom of the ocean,” Houston said. He was referring to all three transmissions.

“We are dealing with very deep water, we are dealing with an environment where sometimes you can get false indications. There are lots of noises in the ocean, and sometimes the acoustic equipment can rebound, echo if you like.”

However, this new signal brings hope to many in the frantic search for the black box as the batteries only last for about a month.

“We are hopeful but by no means certain,” Australian Prime Minister Tony Abbott said of the detection of the signals. He added, “This is the most difficult search in human history. We need to be very careful about coming to hard and fast conclusions too soon.”

Image Via YouTube

About the Author

Lacy LangleyLacy is a writer from Texas. She likes spending time in the home office, homeschooling her kids, playing the didgeridoo, caring for her chickens (Thelma and Louise), Rolos, Christmas, and Labyrinth.

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  • William Choate

    Reality check. As much as there is a demand for exhaustive searches,
    it is those who cannot and will not be paying for it that are demanding
    it. The folks who lost those thousands of missing in action soldiers in
    previous wars also would like exhaustive searches. How about the MIAs
    of Korea and Vietnam? Still more leads never followed up because just
    one success would suggest more should have been done. After seeing
    how long it took to locate the Titanic, I rather think that Admiral had the
    right idea when he said it is not just locating the hay stack, we can’t even
    find the farm!

    • YeahYeah

      How could you compare this to war and soldiers? These people didn’t exactly sign up to be lost or killed–they were taken against their will with no way of defending themselves or to reach out for help–you sign up for war, and know what you are going into before you do. Also, there are many reasons why it is important for this search to go on (use your brain).

      • YeahYeah

        You sound like someone who just gives up easily, and doesn’t have a very broad view of the world; I hope that this changes for you in this life.

      • therese

        agreed, with the exception that “you sign up for war”… not always true. There was a massive draft going on during the Vietnam war, don’t know if you’re of that age, but lots of young men barely out of high school were called to duty, and lots never came back. Either way, we should always try our best to recover those lost tragically.

        • YeahYeah

          Right I had that in mind but didn’t think it was relevant at all since that was the past and this is the present, with all due respect… I am assuming that this person was referencing more “recent” wars and those who were lost then… So of course, I am aware of how those people were lost in history, but is completely irrelevant.

          • YeahYeah

            They they were *also referencing is what I meant

  • Patsy Goodman

    so- are the ping sounds continuous or just random?

  • John

    I saw that rag tag portable strung out so called sounding receptors the China ship threw in the water. I hope that it works for them. What is probably working for them is their super secret state of the art reception equipment that is secret to everyone else. The China govmt. are heavyweights at secrets.