Science

Insulin Inhaler Afrezza Approved By FDA

It took over a decade and nearly $1 billion of his personal fortune but Los Angeles inventor Alfred Mann’s quest to develop an inhalable form of insulin finally won approval from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) Friday, according to the Los Angeles Times. MannKind Corp. of Valencia, Mann’s company, got the approval to sell the drug called Afrezza …

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Fukushima Radiation Tested for Along Pacific Coast

In March of 2011, a 9.0 earthquake in the Pacific triggered a tsunami which hit the coast of Japan, nearly demolishing the Fukushima nuclear power plant and resulting in huge amounts of radiation being washed into the ocean. In the three years since the event occurred, not much fall-out has been seen from the nuclear waste. However, many coastal cities …

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Curiosity Rover Celebrates First Year on Mars

NASA’s Mars Curiosity rover touched down on the Red Planet in August 2012, nearly two years ago. However, today marks the one year Martian anniversary of the rover’s presence on Mars, a feat many thought would never been seen. Mars, being further away from the sun than Earth, takes 687 days for one revolution to occur, meaning that a year …

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Climate Change Presents Risk to US Business

In a nonpartisan study released by the Risky Business Project, leading economic and environmental figures have assessed the monetary threat that climate change proposes to business in the United States. The findings are not optimistic. The study, led by former New York City Mayor Michael Bloomberg, former Treasury Secretary Henry M. Paulson Jr. and former hedge fund manager Thomas F. …

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Allergy Treatments: From Pharmacy To Self-Hypnosis

Feeling like the respiratory spasmodic little dude from Snow White this summer? While that anticipated pollen vortex was not nearly as unpleasant as expected, we may not be out of the woods – so to speak. Experts concede that the most intense of summer allergies may be yet to come. For some of us that signifies a series of sneezing …

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Diabetes Management Goes ‘Bionic’ With New Device

Researchers involved in two National Institutes of Health-funded studies have developed a ‘bionic’ pancreas that monitors a patient’s blood sugar levels and makes Type 1 diabetes more manageable. Created by researchers at Boston University and Massachusetts General Hospital, the experimental device is not actually an organ or something transplanted within a patient’s body. It involves three parts: two pager-sized hormone …

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$1000-A-Pill Sovaldi A Breakthrough Or A Burden?

It’s a pill that cures hepatitis C in 9 out of 10 patients, leading medical societies to recommend it as the first line of treatment against the illness. The catch of Sovaldi, a new pill for hepatitis C, is its price tag: $1000 for a pill, with treatment costs ballooning up to $90,000, according to an Associated Press report. “People …

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Hubble Telescope to Search For New Kuiper Belt Objects

Launched in early 2006, NASA’s New Horizons spacecraft is scheduled to rendezvous with dwarf planet Pluto in a little over one year. The observatory will fly within 6,200 miles of Pluto, gathering data on the dwarf planet and its companion moons. After its encounter with Pluto, New Horizons will continue to fly further into the Kuiper Belt where thousands of …

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Mars Flying Saucer Test Postponed By NASA

NASA is preparing to launch a “flying saucer” into Earth’s atmosphere in order to test the technology that may be used to land on Mars. However, the test has been postponed many times due to incliment weather conditions. The next chance to launch the flying saucer will be on June 14. According to the agency, the flying saucer test will be …

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Jawless Ancient Fish: Distant Relative To Humans

Fossils of a prehistoric fish are revealing important details about the earliest vertebrate life on earth. A discovery was made that shows jaws evolved in animals that have backbones. On Wednesday, researchers described the fossil specimens of the fish that were uncovered at the Burgess Shale in the Canadian Rockies. Many of the fossils were preserved, which allowed scientists to …

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Turing Test Passed by Chatbot Simulating a 13-Year-Old

Computer science researchers this week revealed that the road to artificial intelligence (AI) has been paved a bit further. A computer algorithm developed in Saint Petersburg, Russia passed the Turing test at an event at the Royal Society of London this weekend. The Turing test, laid out by computer scientist Alan Turing in 1950, is a method by which researchers …

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Lung Cancer Treatment Resistance Reversed in New Study

Lung cancer patients got some good news this week as a new study has shown how doctors might reverse genetic resistance to a common lung cancer drug. According to the study’s authors, around 40% of lung cancer patients are resistant to a specific targeted therapy drug known as erlotinib. The drug is an EGFR inhibitor and the therapy is meant …

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