Boston Marathon Bombings: A Year Later

By: Toni Matthews-El - April 15, 2014

One year ago today, two backpacks containing pressure cooker bombs exploded near the finish line of the Boston Marathon.

The two blasts took three innocent lives: 8-year-old Martin Richard; 23-year-old Lingzi Lu; and 29-year-old Krystle Campbell. There were 264 reported injuries as a result of the bombings.

On the anniversary of this horrific event, the city of Boston, Mass. and surviving victims have come together, determined to not let the memory of that horrible day defeat them. Said Nancy Taylor, minister of the Old South church in Boston, “We’re going to reclaim the finish line and take our race back.”

At 2:49 pm, family members of the victims will hold a minute long silence in observation of the victims of the Boston Marathon bombings. This will mark the time of the explosion of the first bomb.

The Old South church’s bell will be rung at the end of the minute of silence.

Prior to the observation, 3,000 people are expected to take part in a special ceremony at Boston’s Hynes Convention Center. The invitation-only tribute will be attended by Vice-President Joe Biden, Massachusetts Governor Deval Patrick, and newly-elected Boston Mayor Martin Walsh among others.

In the aftermath of the Boston Marathon Bombings, steps have been taken to ensure that the events of that day are not repeated.

Over 100 cameras have been installed along the Boston city portion of the marathon. There have been 50 observation points set up around the area of the finish line to carefully monitor the crowd.

As an extra safety measure, traffic and parking will be prohibited on certain streets in the days leading up to the marathon.

Even with all the added measures, Boston law enforcement and city officials will still have their work cut out for them. This year the level of participation is up 9,000 spots to 36,000. The sharp rise in participants suggests there will be even more observers on hand than there were last year.

Despite the additional work needed to assure the safety of runners and supporters, it’s encouraging that so many have been moved to show up this year in support of the city and event.

This year’s race is scheduled to take place on Monday, April 21st.

Image via Wikimedia Commons

About the Author

Toni Matthews-ElToni Matthews-El hails from the land of chunked pumpkins and people who come to a complete stop before making any and every turn. When she isn't contributing articles to WebProNews, she spends her time freelance writing, cheering Liverpool FC, and enjoying life as a hair flower connoisseur. Disclaimer: Written opinions do not necessarily reflect that of WebProNews or its affiliates

View all posts by Toni Matthews-El
  • Lisa Torres

    The Dark Side Of The
    Watertown Police Department

    The
    Watertown Police Department may have help capture Tamerlan and
    Dzhokhar Tsarnaev, but they will never protect an innocent civilian
    from harassment from a police officer in their department. From 2005
    to 2010 while living in Watertown, I was an innocent victim of police
    surveillance harassment.

    Every
    time I left the house, a Watertown police car would follow me down
    the street on my walk to 7 Eleven and to the bus stop everyday.
    While I stood at the bus stop on Mount Auburn Street infront of the
    Town Diner, the Watertown police would drive back and forth watching
    me with suspicion.

    In
    fear of this harassment, I began to only leave the building at night.
    This is when a Watertown police car was stationed across the building
    on a dark street waiting for me to leave in order to follow me down
    the street.

    When
    I called to complain about the harassment, Officer Stuart of the
    Watertown Police Department told me to get mental help and that he
    would call an ambulance. He also instructed all the dispatchers to
    hang up on me whenever I call.

    When
    calling the Watertown Police Station to report police harassment, you
    are asked who YOU are and were YOU live and then they try to find
    inconsistencies in your statement to accuse you of lying. For
    example, he misheard my name the first time and tried to accuse me of
    lying about my name. I was also told that I am tieing up the line for
    more serious calls. Calls against harassing Watertown police officers
    are not taken seriously, only calls against members of the general
    public are taken seriously.

    When
    civilian dispatchers answered the phone, they express a genuine
    concern and willingness to help, but when a police officer dispatcher
    answered the phone, he tries to punish you for reporting a fellow
    officer. The Watertown Police are also a racist organization. They
    drive past every young black guy who happens to be walking by. If
    your sitting on a porch or just standing on the sidewalk having a
    conversation and a young black man walks by, rest assure that the
    Waterown Police will be driving by very shortly. Homely looking white males get the similiar treatment.

    Police
    Cheif Ed Devoe is a kind and compassionate man, but unfortunately he
    lacks any control of his own police department. It actually sickened
    me to hear him call Watertown Police officers the best in the country
    in his interview with Brian Williams. There are just a handful of
    police officers in the Watertown Police department that are good,
    decent, wonderful human beings, but many of them are bullies in
    inform who harass the innocent for nothing they have ever done. If
    you want to celebrate the heroism of anyone involved in the capture
    of the bombing suspects, give your praises to the North Metro Swat
    Team, the HSI, the ATF or the homeowner who found Dzohkar in his
    backyard boat, not the Watertown Police Department.

    Bad
    cop exist in every police department in the country. Please contact
    your congressional representative and urge that they pass legislation
    to protect innocent civilians from police harassment.
    http://www.house.gov/representatives/