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YouTube changes their standard embed code to the iFrame format

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[ Business]

While YouTube has featured the iFrame embed capability for about six months now, they’ve quietly promoted this method to be the primary embed format, all in an effort to further the transition to HTML 5 protocols.

Until recently, the standard embed format used the object tag, like so:

<object width="480" height="385"><param name="movie" value="http://www.youtube.com/v/wsZ8h9_X-A4?fs=1&amp;hl=en_US"></param><param name="allowFullScreen" value="true"></param><param name="allowscriptaccess" value="always"></param><embed src="http://www.youtube.com/v/wsZ8h9_X-A4?fs=1&amp;hl=en_US" type="application/x-shockwave-flash" allowscriptaccess="always" allowfullscreen="true" width="480" height="385"></embed></object>

But now, when a user depresses the embed button, they are greeted with this:

<iframe title="YouTube video player" class="youtube-player" type="text/html" width="640" height="390" src="http://www.youtube.com/embed/UcnEIgmq8iw" frameborder="0" allowFullScreen></iframe>

As indicated, the ability to use iFrame embeds has been around since July of 2010, but the change in default embed format reveals YouTube’s preference for an HTML 5 world.  Users can still use the orginal <object>-based embeds by selecting the “Use old embed code” selection if desired.

In terms of compatibility, at least one WordPress blogger — the author of this post — indicates their blog’s backend stripped the iFrame tag out, making the new style unusable.  Granted, the iFrame removal could be because of any number of WordPress plugins — the SEO plugin is one suspect — nevertheless, there are some compatibility issues with YouTube’s new format.

Considering iFrames aren’t necessarily SEO-friendly to begin with, something the ReelSEO blog discusses here, perhaps the WordPress bloggers of the world should continue using the old embed style, or perhaps disable their SEO plugins.

More from ReelSEO:

iFrames are, generally speaking, not a good thing for SEO. They are, by definition, displaying content on a page that belongs to an entirely different webpage.  So your site won’t typically get any of the ranking benefits you might expect if the content was directly on your page… If you embed videos frequently, and care about ranking for terms related to those videos, I’d say it’s probably time for a major round of rank testing.

And with that, YouTube is firmly in the HTML 5 corner, although, they are kind enough to throw a bone to those who prefer the old embed format. 

I’m looking at you, WordPress bloggers.

YouTube
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  • http://www.freeguninfo.com Adsense Publisher

    Don’t forget that on top of everything, Youtube gets a page impression every time a video that’s iframed on your site loads. Where with the previous methods it does not. All it gets is the call from the visitor to show the video. It’s very hard looking at raw logs to say, ok, this came from another site and this came from Youtube when more and more people are going to iframe instead of embed.

    Since iframes can be used as a blackhat SEO trick to boost page impressions when your content is hosted on other sites, I wonder how Google is going to explain how what they are doing is not because they want to inflate their traffic counts, and how they would justify continued usage of it if their traffic numbers shot up and people claimed it was due to their iframe usage.

    I wonder if more and more video providers will switch to this method as well to inflate their visitor and traffic counts as if these people were actually on their own website and not just viewing a video on another site.

  • http://www.ebizroi.com/blog/ Rick Noel

    Funny that there was mention of complaints from WordPress users. I tried to embed a video from LinkedIn on their new InMaps network visualization services in a WordPress blog post yesterday and noticed that the iframe does not render correctly.

    To include the video, I had to switch to the “Use old embed code” option in order to get the video and player control to render properly in the post (http://www.ebizroi.com/blog/?p=727).

    One does have to wonder if YouTube making the iframe default option for video playback on non YouTube sites has ulterior motivations for pumping playback statistics and what the future of YouTube might be based on those motivations.

  • http://mostpopularvideos.org/ Rob K

    Today the most popular video sharing website YouTube not only introduces worldwide incompatibility with its new iframe embed requirements, but they also killed many 3rd party player APIs with the switch from AS2 to AS3 which will now make videos so embedded show the “Embedding disabled” message, which seems to be the case for any youtube video that has built in adsense advertising.

    These more sophisticated embed methods are not the norm for most web operators but thousands find themselves now with non-working videos and playlists all over the web, being reported around the net since this morning.

  • http://www.ebook-site.com Bryan

    Rightly or wrongly, once again, Google displays how much Power it now exerts on the web today.

YouTube

YouTube changes their standard embed code to the iFrame format

Get the WebProNews Newsletter:


[ Business]

While YouTube has featured the iFrame embed capability for about six months now, they’ve quietly promoted this method to be the primary embed format, all in an effort to further the transition to HTML 5 protocols.

Until recently, the standard embed format used the object tag, like so:

<object width="480" height="385"><param name="movie" value="http://www.youtube.com/v/wsZ8h9_X-A4?fs=1&amp;hl=en_US"></param><param name="allowFullScreen" value="true"></param><param name="allowscriptaccess" value="always"></param><embed src="http://www.youtube.com/v/wsZ8h9_X-A4?fs=1&amp;hl=en_US" type="application/x-shockwave-flash" allowscriptaccess="always" allowfullscreen="true" width="480" height="385"></embed></object>

But now, when a user depresses the embed button, they are greeted with this:

<iframe title="YouTube video player" class="youtube-player" type="text/html" width="640" height="390" src="http://www.youtube.com/embed/UcnEIgmq8iw" frameborder="0" allowFullScreen></iframe>

As indicated, the ability to use iFrame embeds has been around since July of 2010, but the change in default embed format reveals YouTube’s preference for an HTML 5 world.  Users can still use the orginal <object>-based embeds by selecting the “Use old embed code” selection if desired.

In terms of compatibility, at least one WordPress blogger — the author of this post — indicates their blog’s backend stripped the iFrame tag out, making the new style unusable.  Granted, the iFrame removal could be because of any number of WordPress plugins — the SEO plugin is one suspect — nevertheless, there are some compatibility issues with YouTube’s new format.

Considering iFrames aren’t necessarily SEO-friendly to begin with, something the ReelSEO blog discusses here, perhaps the WordPress bloggers of the world should continue using the old embed style, or perhaps disable their SEO plugins.

More from ReelSEO:

iFrames are, generally speaking, not a good thing for SEO. They are, by definition, displaying content on a page that belongs to an entirely different webpage.  So your site won’t typically get any of the ranking benefits you might expect if the content was directly on your page… If you embed videos frequently, and care about ranking for terms related to those videos, I’d say it’s probably time for a major round of rank testing.

And with that, YouTube is firmly in the HTML 5 corner, although, they are kind enough to throw a bone to those who prefer the old embed format. 

I’m looking at you, WordPress bloggers.

YouTube
Comments Off
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YouTube

YouTube changes their standard embed code to the iFrame format

Get the WebProNews Newsletter:


[ Business]

While YouTube has featured the iFrame embed capability for about six months now, they’ve quietly promoted this method to be the primary embed format, all in an effort to further the transition to HTML 5 protocols.

Until recently, the standard embed format used the object tag, like so:

<object width="480" height="385"><param name="movie" value="http://www.youtube.com/v/wsZ8h9_X-A4?fs=1&amp;hl=en_US"></param><param name="allowFullScreen" value="true"></param><param name="allowscriptaccess" value="always"></param><embed src="http://www.youtube.com/v/wsZ8h9_X-A4?fs=1&amp;hl=en_US" type="application/x-shockwave-flash" allowscriptaccess="always" allowfullscreen="true" width="480" height="385"></embed></object>

But now, when a user depresses the embed button, they are greeted with this:

<iframe title="YouTube video player" class="youtube-player" type="text/html" width="640" height="390" src="http://www.youtube.com/embed/UcnEIgmq8iw" frameborder="0" allowFullScreen></iframe>

As indicated, the ability to use iFrame embeds has been around since July of 2010, but the change in default embed format reveals YouTube’s preference for an HTML 5 world.  Users can still use the orginal <object>-based embeds by selecting the “Use old embed code” selection if desired.

In terms of compatibility, at least one WordPress blogger — the author of this post — indicates their blog’s backend stripped the iFrame tag out, making the new style unusable.  Granted, the iFrame removal could be because of any number of WordPress plugins — the SEO plugin is one suspect — nevertheless, there are some compatibility issues with YouTube’s new format.

Considering iFrames aren’t necessarily SEO-friendly to begin with, something the ReelSEO blog discusses here, perhaps the WordPress bloggers of the world should continue using the old embed style, or perhaps disable their SEO plugins.

More from ReelSEO:

iFrames are, generally speaking, not a good thing for SEO. They are, by definition, displaying content on a page that belongs to an entirely different webpage.  So your site won’t typically get any of the ranking benefits you might expect if the content was directly on your page… If you embed videos frequently, and care about ranking for terms related to those videos, I’d say it’s probably time for a major round of rank testing.

And with that, YouTube is firmly in the HTML 5 corner, although, they are kind enough to throw a bone to those who prefer the old embed format. 

I’m looking at you, WordPress bloggers.

YouTube
Comments Off
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