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Verizon May Follow AT&T Pricing Model, Eliminating Unlimited Data Plans

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Verizon may soon be following in the footsteps of AT&T with a tiered pricing plan. Bloomberg interviewed Verizon Communications CFO John Killian, who told them they’d "probably need to change the design of our pricing where it will not be [a] totally unlimited, flat rate." There were mixed feelings about this when AT&T did it, with a large amount of negative opinion. Verizon will no doubt face a similar uproar.

Chitika Research has shared some findings looking at Android distribution by Handset. The Motorola Droid is the most popular Android handset "by far" according to the firm.

Android Handset Distribution

Speaking of Droids, popular gadget blog Gizmodo has shared some first impressions of the Droid 2 from a reader who was able to get his hands on one. According to this reader, it may not be actually called the Droid 2, but it is the successor to the Droid.

Apple’s release of the new MobileMe Mail is the subject of a great deal of discussion throughout the Blogosphere. More on that here.

Nokia announced that all of its phones in 2011 will come with NFC (Near Field Communication), which can be used to turn devices into transportation tickets, debit cards, and house keys. Should be interesting for Nokia sales. According to TheStreet.com, Apple may have some suppy-and-demand issues with the recently announced iPhone 4, citing a production problem with display screens holding up the whole process.

Digitimes (via BoyGenius)reports that Apple is shipping 1.2 million iPads per month. Here are some stats Steve Jobs reported at Apple’s recent Worldwide Developer Conference (where the iPhone 4 was officially unveiled).

Verizon May Follow AT&T Pricing Model, Eliminating Unlimited Data Plans
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  • Guest

    I use my G1 as the sole internet provider for me and my room mate. Its handy and no matter what my internet charges are a flat $30 rate.

    For all of you who think ATT is doing a good thing (essentially you iPhone users) read this article :

    http://getyourgadgetsgoing.com/2010/06/03/how-att-will-empty-your-pocket/

  • Guest

    Greed… the new cancer.

    I stopped using cell phones 3 years ago and have, most amazingly, somehow survived! lol :D

    Everytime a company screws me over/under, rather than bend over, I drop them like a bad habit.

    Life is much happier these days :)

  • Guest

    I haven’t stopped using cell phones. I switched to prepaid. It’s simple. Call me silly, but I use a cell phone for, well… talking. For a buck I can talk to anyone on my carrier as long as I want, as many times as I want, all day long. If I need to call off carrier it’s 10 cents a minute. I rarely need to talk off carrier. All of my family and coworkers are on the same carrier. If I don’t use the phone I don’t pay. Every penny rolls over. If I ever feel screwed by the company I can just throw the phone in the river and walk away without looking back.

    I have never been in such urgent need of data that I couldn’t wait to slide into a wifi zone with my laptop, where I can do real browsing, remote computing and whatever else I need to do online. If I’m ever really stuck there is a quick and simple yellow pages feature on my phone.

    I am the first to admit that the smart phones and apps are totally cool, but still think they are nothing more than a novelty for most users. I’m sure some do get real value from them, but I’ll bet the share is relatively low. These are probably the users who consume the most data. If a tiered plan cuts a break to the novelty users while letting the real resource consumers pay their fair share, it’s a good thing. Those who have issues with tiered pricing are probably the same people that buy unlimited web hosting even though they would never use up all the resources of a base account.

  • http://www.artofstorytellingshow.com/ Storytelling

    I have been tempted recently – but to the most part cell phones are a real quality of life issue and they seem to carry too many negatives to be worth the energy.