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Marketing Consumer Packaged Goods Online
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A little over a year ago, research showed that 44% of traffic to consumer packaged goods (CPG) sites came from search. These days, searchers are getting even more specific when searching for these kinds of items.

Sally Falkow looked at the phenomenon last year, referring to research from comScore, Procter & Gamble, Yahoo, and SEMPO. Highlights she pointed out about the motivation of searchers were:

More Consumers Going Online To Research Products

Seventy percent of consumers use the Internet to research consumer packaged goods before visiting a store according to a survey from Prospectiv "2007 Consumer Packaged Goods survey."

When conducting research for consumer packaged goods (CPG) online 27 percent of consumers say they prefer e-newsletters followed by 25 percent who favor search tools. Fourteen percent said they used general saving and shopping sites along with branded product sites.

CPG Brand Sites Attract 66 Million Visitors

During the third quarter of 2007, consumer packaged goods (CPG) brand sites brought in a total of 66 million U.S. visitors, an increase of 10 percent over the same period last year, according to comScore.

Smelly Armpits Stopped With Online CPG Buys

Consumer packaged goods, aka CPG, have been attracting more purchases online by consumers, and brand manufacturers (and their ad budgets) have noticed.

Tasty Advertising Key For Food Retailers

Thanksgiving through New Year’s Eve make for a time of increased consumption, one that online retailers with a savory bent should consider with their ad campaigns.

Stinky Babies, Armpits Offer SEM Opportunities

Baby products and personal care products drew millions of searches over a three month period in early 2007, indicating growth potential for search engine marketing efforts by consumer packaged goods (CPG) companies.

Online CPG Reviews Popular With Consumers

Consumer product reviews are becoming more trusted according to a Deloitte Consumer Product Group study. Deloitte revealed that 62 percent of Internet users read product reviews written by fellow consumers.

It’s Official: “Funny Videos” = “YouTube”

Remember all the hubbub about using Google’s name to describe searches on other engines?  New data suggests that “YouTube” has become synonymous with “funny videos,” and I don’t expect Mountain View to make as much of a fuss over this custom.

Google Recommends Running Lots Of Ads

Displaying ads over multiple locations increases the likelihood of gaining a conversion from the Internet audience.