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Scammers Targeting Amazon Retailers With Fake Receipts

Hackers creating fake Amazon receipts

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Cyber criminals are using a hacking program to create fake receipts for items sold through Amazon.com and its retail partners, in an effort to receive refunds or new products, according to security firm GFI Software.

“The free program available online allows scammers to create an HTML ‘receipt’ for phantom Amazon.com purchases,” said Christopher Boyd, senior threat researcher, GFI Software

 

Amazon-Scam

 

“By capturing a screenshot of the fake receipt, these cyber criminals are able to email unsuspecting sellers claiming they are missing items. This type of fraud, perpetrated en masse, could result in massive losses for retailers, especially during the holiday shopping season.”

GFI says there are some indications that a receipt is fake. The merchant will not have a record of the purchase, but Amazon should be able to confirm that no purchase was ever made. Merchants should check the orange order number at the top of the receipt because those are randomly selected from a set of looping numbers every time the scammer clicks on the “Order Number” button. The seller or Amazon should be able to verify whether it is a valid order number. Finally, the program seems to add random digits on the “Visa: payment method” section in payment information, which warrants further investigation.

“Many of the items in the fake printout are convincing as a whole, but once you start digging into the details a little bit, it quickly falls apart. If a ‘customer’ seems a little peculiar, ensure you take a good look at their receipt,” warned Boyd.

 

Scammers Targeting Amazon Retailers With Fake Receipts
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  • Guest

    I’m so tired of these cyber criminals ruining everything.

  • http://www.promorewards.co.uk Jolena

    These scammers need controlling. Problem is, I guess because they are based around the globe, it is harder to monitor and get them. Not good though.

  • http://www.seattleokay.com Adsense Publisher

    I can’t believe that anybody would fall for the scam.
    It’s too easy to prove that the transaction never occurred.

    It’s like those emails that say your paypal account has been suspended due to suspicious activity or that your balance in paypal is negative. So you log into paypal (not from the link in the email, which isn’t paypal) and you see you still have X dollars and there isn’t anything that looks suspicious.

    Aside from the refund angle, has anybody thought that all some of the fake receipt senders were only looking for was perhaps a valid email address to sell to the spammers?