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Millennials Won

Gen Y to continue social sharing

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[ Business]

Millennials are expected to make online sharing a lifelong habit, according to new research from Pew Internet and Elon University.

In an online survey of 895 technology stakeholders and critics, 67 percent agreed with the following statement:

"By 2020, members of Generation Y (today’s "digital natives") will continue to be ambient broadcasters who disclose a great deal of personal information in order to stay connected and take advantage of social, economic, and political opportunities. Even as they mature, have families, and take on more significant responsibilities, their enthusiasm for widespread information sharing will carry forward."

Some 29 percent agreed with the opposite statement:

"By 2020, members of Generation Y (today’s "digital natives") will have "grown out" of much of their use of social networks, multiplayer online games and other time-consuming, transparency-engendering online tools. As they age and find new interests and commitments, their enthusiasm for widespread information sharing will abate."

 

Social-Sharing

 

Most of those surveyed believed the sharing of personal information online has many social benefits as people open up to others in order to build friendships, form and find communities, seek help, and build their reputations. They said Millennials have already seen the benefits and will not reduce their use of these social tools over the next decade as they take on more responsibilities while growing older.

"The majority noted that new social norms that reward disclosure are already in place among the young," said Pew Internet Director Lee Rainie.

"Some experts also expressed hope that society will be more forgiving of those whose youthful mistakes are on display in social media such as Facebook picture albums or YouTube videos."

Nearly 30% of respondents said the abundant sharing of personal information on social networks by young people will fade, most of them noting that life stages and milestones do matter and do prompt changes in behavior.

Among other things, many of the dissenting experts also said Millennials will not have as much time in the future to devote to popular activities such as frequently posting to the world at large on YouTube, Twitter or Facebook about the details of their lives.

"Some of the experts said an awkward trial-and-error period is unfolding and will continue over the next decade, as people adjust to new realities about how social networks perform and as new boundaries are set about the personal information that is appropriate to share," said Janna Anderson, director of the Imagining the Internet Center and a co-author of the study.

 

 

Millennials Won
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  • http://www.tweetaboogle.com/ Guest

    There is an increasing number of sites that lets you keep you data and still be social. Diaspora is one such attempt that got funded in kickstarter. And there are other approaches when you can be social anonymously. Site where what you are doesn’t really matter but what you say matters. One such example is http://www.tweetaboogle.com/

  • http://www.go-games.com Grey Olltwit

    Not so long ago MySpace was the “in” place to be posting and socialising. The internet is such a fickle creature powered by trends and fads that whilst I agree most of Generation Y (who comes up with these labels??) will be posting on social media of some kind, I’m not sure it will be Facebook and Twitter but probably something quite different in 2020 that perhaps can be updated by thought or voice activation.

  • http://eztramadol.com micheal

    I think that when the general population comes to realize in the coming years just how easily the information they so casually make public can be misused.

  • http://www.sunderlandfilms.com Sunderland

    who writes this rubbish, facebook and youtube will be long gone by 2020, just like hotbot and goplay before them.

  • Dave Lauretti

    Us generation X’ers started out with Pac Man and other video games and from what I’ve read and heard (on the news) twice over the past few years is that generation X’ers are also the age bracket that plays online gaming more than any other generation.

    Most of the 7 year olds of today are going to be playing video games when they’re in their 30s and the same goes with their social networking / online sharing behaviour.

    Technology has already been created that allows one to access the internet and watch video through sunglasses. Yes the image is in front of your eyes like The Terminator.

    http://singularityhub.com/2009/10/26/glasses-to-project-images-directly-into-retina-terminator-style/

    I’d say in less than 50 years we” be able to share everything we want with each other through our thoughts.

    Social sharing is the biggest technological and social revolution ever.

  • http://www.hostwave.com Brian

    Millennials and Y’s can thank the X’s for their hard-work and contribution for these social-network playgrounds. I think peeps will just get burned out facin’, myspacin’ and being twitters as newer SN become the fad. As we know younger gen’s always have a lot more time on their hands to pour at these sites and those young ones will always age and phase out.

  • lol

    Anyone have a bunch of Gen Y kids,? the kind that HAVE A LIFE? This article is drivel, as is the research. Why not go to the Beach or an event, where these people are actually having a LIFE, and partaking in life (the majority of these kids) and ask them how often they REALLY are on facebook, or myspace, or even twitter. In fact the majority of the kids think Twitter is totally for geeks.. They are actually partaking in Life, rather than being engulfed in the internet.

    Which brings you to that obviously this article was written for geeks by a geek.. not a negative thing, but, obviously not aware of what IS actually occurring in the Life of People beyond the scope of the internet.

    Take time away from the internet today, go to the park, the beach, a ball game, something, in the Outdoors.. and see how this generation like all the generations before it, Love to be involved with Life.. and Myspace and Twitter isn’t life.

  • http://www.theexpertseocompany.com Andrew

    I’m kinda thinking that as generations grow up, they will stop posting a lot of stuff on social media but as a new generation takes over, they will make the same mistakes as did the previous generation. Hopefully though, they might learn form the mistakes made by others.

  • http://www.webdesignkc.co.uk Jack Bagombaney

    Thought provoking post Mike! I agree with what yourself and Grey are saying – social media is here to stay but in ever-changing mediums, as the ‘MySpace Model’ proves.

    Having said that, i personally think Twitter has a lot of life left. The idea of delivering a message in as short a package as possible clearly appeals to our apathetic Generation Y!!

  • http://www.webfullcircle.com/ Nate Smathers

    It is hard to agree or disagree on the matter. If you take Myspace (the social media supernova) and Facebook “The Center of the Social Media Universe” you could easily make the conclusion that all forms of social media, social networking or what ever you want to title it will continue to shuffle. As long as we invest hours upon hours online there will always be something else to capture the ADD tendencies of my generation (Y) as well as the millionals, which will be 10X more apparent by 2020. Cheers!

  • http://mikefarrow.net Word of Mouth Mike

    Anyone who takes the time to study trends or fads will realise that Facebook is here to stay, many hundreds of millions of people have invested significant effort in sharing with their peers.

    These are not geeks and nerds but people with a life who also are educated enough to use a computer and understand the importance of sharing, transparency and communications.

    Social networking is nothing new, is just a more sophisticated way of doing something that intelligent societies have always done, maintaining a healthy circle of passing acquaintance.

    The industrial revolution and broadcast media took these away from us in an attempt to control the masses but you cannot suppress global consciousness, it will always find a way to express itself.

    Recent studies have shown that social networkers could be healthier and have greater self-esteem (Journal of Computer-Mediated Communications, Vol 12, p1143)

  • David

    Some people use 1977 as the start date for the Millenial Generation for 3 reasons:

    1. A chart on a website proves that the “Baby Bust” REALLY ended that year – 3.3 million babies were born in ’77 and 3.14 in ’76 (a difference of 160,000).

    2. Those born then just came of age when the web first became available to the public in ’95, hence the term “Net Generation,” or another name for gen y.

    3. Studies have shown that those born in the late ’70s have very similar attitudes to those born in the ’80s (the former also voted 66 – 32 in favor of Obama).

    I, however, believe that ANYONE can be gen y if he/she is tech – savvy, open – minded to ALL kinds of diversity, and is into the latest music and entertainment. The reason for this is that there are just some people who do not fit into the generation to which they were assigned, which is why dates do not matter. What counts is a person’s CHARACTERISTICS!

Millennials Won

Gen Y to continue social sharing

Get the WebProNews Newsletter:
[ Business]

Millennials are expected to make online sharing a lifelong habit, according to new research from Pew Internet and Elon University.

In an online survey of 895 technology stakeholders and critics, 67 percent agreed with the following statement:

"By 2020, members of Generation Y (today’s "digital natives") will continue to be ambient broadcasters who disclose a great deal of personal information in order to stay connected and take advantage of social, economic, and political opportunities. Even as they mature, have families, and take on more significant responsibilities, their enthusiasm for widespread information sharing will carry forward."

Some 29 percent agreed with the opposite statement:

"By 2020, members of Generation Y (today’s "digital natives") will have "grown out" of much of their use of social networks, multiplayer online games and other time-consuming, transparency-engendering online tools. As they age and find new interests and commitments, their enthusiasm for widespread information sharing will abate."

 

Social-Sharing

 

Most of those surveyed believed the sharing of personal information online has many social benefits as people open up to others in order to build friendships, form and find communities, seek help, and build their reputations. They said Millennials have already seen the benefits and will not reduce their use of these social tools over the next decade as they take on more responsibilities while growing older.

"The majority noted that new social norms that reward disclosure are already in place among the young," said Pew Internet Director Lee Rainie.

"Some experts also expressed hope that society will be more forgiving of those whose youthful mistakes are on display in social media such as Facebook picture albums or YouTube videos."

Nearly 30% of respondents said the abundant sharing of personal information on social networks by young people will fade, most of them noting that life stages and milestones do matter and do prompt changes in behavior.

Among other things, many of the dissenting experts also said Millennials will not have as much time in the future to devote to popular activities such as frequently posting to the world at large on YouTube, Twitter or Facebook about the details of their lives.

"Some of the experts said an awkward trial-and-error period is unfolding and will continue over the next decade, as people adjust to new realities about how social networks perform and as new boundaries are set about the personal information that is appropriate to share," said Janna Anderson, director of the Imagining the Internet Center and a co-author of the study.

 

 

Millennials Won
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Millennials Won

Gen Y to continue social sharing

Get the WebProNews Newsletter:
[ Business]

Millennials are expected to make online sharing a lifelong habit, according to new research from Pew Internet and Elon University.

In an online survey of 895 technology stakeholders and critics, 67 percent agreed with the following statement:

"By 2020, members of Generation Y (today’s "digital natives") will continue to be ambient broadcasters who disclose a great deal of personal information in order to stay connected and take advantage of social, economic, and political opportunities. Even as they mature, have families, and take on more significant responsibilities, their enthusiasm for widespread information sharing will carry forward."

Some 29 percent agreed with the opposite statement:

"By 2020, members of Generation Y (today’s "digital natives") will have "grown out" of much of their use of social networks, multiplayer online games and other time-consuming, transparency-engendering online tools. As they age and find new interests and commitments, their enthusiasm for widespread information sharing will abate."

 

Social-Sharing

 

Most of those surveyed believed the sharing of personal information online has many social benefits as people open up to others in order to build friendships, form and find communities, seek help, and build their reputations. They said Millennials have already seen the benefits and will not reduce their use of these social tools over the next decade as they take on more responsibilities while growing older.

"The majority noted that new social norms that reward disclosure are already in place among the young," said Pew Internet Director Lee Rainie.

"Some experts also expressed hope that society will be more forgiving of those whose youthful mistakes are on display in social media such as Facebook picture albums or YouTube videos."

Nearly 30% of respondents said the abundant sharing of personal information on social networks by young people will fade, most of them noting that life stages and milestones do matter and do prompt changes in behavior.

Among other things, many of the dissenting experts also said Millennials will not have as much time in the future to devote to popular activities such as frequently posting to the world at large on YouTube, Twitter or Facebook about the details of their lives.

"Some of the experts said an awkward trial-and-error period is unfolding and will continue over the next decade, as people adjust to new realities about how social networks perform and as new boundaries are set about the personal information that is appropriate to share," said Janna Anderson, director of the Imagining the Internet Center and a co-author of the study.

 

 

Millennials Won
Comments Off
Top Rated White Papers and Resources

Millennials Won

Gen Y to continue social sharing

Get the WebProNews Newsletter:
[ Business]

Millennials are expected to make online sharing a lifelong habit, according to new research from Pew Internet and Elon University.

In an online survey of 895 technology stakeholders and critics, 67 percent agreed with the following statement:

"By 2020, members of Generation Y (today’s "digital natives") will continue to be ambient broadcasters who disclose a great deal of personal information in order to stay connected and take advantage of social, economic, and political opportunities. Even as they mature, have families, and take on more significant responsibilities, their enthusiasm for widespread information sharing will carry forward."

Some 29 percent agreed with the opposite statement:

"By 2020, members of Generation Y (today’s "digital natives") will have "grown out" of much of their use of social networks, multiplayer online games and other time-consuming, transparency-engendering online tools. As they age and find new interests and commitments, their enthusiasm for widespread information sharing will abate."

 

Social-Sharing

 

Most of those surveyed believed the sharing of personal information online has many social benefits as people open up to others in order to build friendships, form and find communities, seek help, and build their reputations. They said Millennials have already seen the benefits and will not reduce their use of these social tools over the next decade as they take on more responsibilities while growing older.

"The majority noted that new social norms that reward disclosure are already in place among the young," said Pew Internet Director Lee Rainie.

"Some experts also expressed hope that society will be more forgiving of those whose youthful mistakes are on display in social media such as Facebook picture albums or YouTube videos."

Nearly 30% of respondents said the abundant sharing of personal information on social networks by young people will fade, most of them noting that life stages and milestones do matter and do prompt changes in behavior.

Among other things, many of the dissenting experts also said Millennials will not have as much time in the future to devote to popular activities such as frequently posting to the world at large on YouTube, Twitter or Facebook about the details of their lives.

"Some of the experts said an awkward trial-and-error period is unfolding and will continue over the next decade, as people adjust to new realities about how social networks perform and as new boundaries are set about the personal information that is appropriate to share," said Janna Anderson, director of the Imagining the Internet Center and a co-author of the study.

 

 

Millennials Won
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