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Google’s Matt Cutts On Why Ads Can Be More Helpful Than Organic Results

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Google’s Matt Cutts On Why Ads Can Be More Helpful Than Organic Results
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Some people think Google’s search results pages are getting too cluttered. There’s no question that Google has been adding more elements to them over the years. In fact, just today, Google announced that it is expanding the “Knowledge Graph Carousel,” its visual placement of fairly large Knowledge Graph results directly underneath the search box, to the rest of the English speaking world. Other languages are surely not too far behind.

Sometimes, however, it’s simply Google ads that are taking up much of the screen real estate, and as we’ve already seen, Google is showing less organic results for a growing number of results pages.

As a user, do you think Google’s paid results are often more helpful than its organic results? Which perform better for your business? Let us know in the comments.

Google’s Matt Cutts participated in an interesting discussion in a Hacker News thread, in response to an article from Jitbit, called, “Google Search is only 18% Search“.

Despite the title, the article is really about how little of the screen is used to display non-paid search results for a Google SERP. In the example author Alex Yumashev uses, Google was found to dedicate 18.5% of the screen to results (not including ads). The author found a screenshot from years ago, where Google was found to dedicate as much as 53% of the screen to results.

Read the article if you want to get into the methodology, the resolutions, etc. There’s certainly room for debate around some of that, but in more general terms, there’s no denying that Google’s SERPs have changed over the years.

Cutts argued that the article has a number of “major issues,” though most of his points are based on the notion that the article is about Google reducing “search” related elements, as opposed to just classic non-paid results, which I don’t think was really the point the author was trying to make.

Cutts points out that the left-hand column is about search, that the search box is about search, and that whitespace is about search. He notes that there are “tons of searches” where Google doesn’t show ads.

“A lot of people like to take a query that shows ads and say ‘Aha!’ but they’re forgetting all the queries that don’t show ads,” said Cutts. “Not to mention that our ads aren’t just a straight auction; we try to take into account things like the quality of the destination page in deciding whether and where to show ads, just like we do with web search results.”

Of course, Yumashev did acknowledge that he was looking for a screen with as many ads as possible, indicating that this is specifically about the pages that do show ads. The “help-desk app” query the author used for the first example certainly does have a fair amount of ads “above the fold“.

In his argument, Cutts said, “We actually think our ads can be as helpful as the search results in some cases. And no, that’s not a new attitude.”

One reader challenged him to come up with an example.

“Ads can totally be useful,” Cutts responded. “Here’s one from earlier today: [att cordless phones]. For Google’s web results, we often interpret a query [X] as ‘information about X.’ The #1 web search result I see is http://telephones.att.com/att/index.cfm/cordless-telephones/ which does have information about cordless phones from AT&T. But I was looking for which models of cordless phones AT&T has. There’s an ad that points to http://telephones.att.com/att/index.cfm/cordless-telephones/… which is actually more helpful because that shows me a bunch of different models.”

“Now you can argue that Google should be able to find and somehow return the page that AT&T bought the ad for,” he added. “But that can be a hard problem (Bing returns the same page that Google does at #1 for example, as does DDG). So that ad was quite helpful for me, because it took me to a great page.”

You can read the Hacker News thread to see Cutts’ comments in their entirety, and completely in context with the rest of the conversation. He also goes into why he thinks Google+ is a good business tool.

There’s no question that Google is cramming more non-traditional content into search results pages than it used to, particularly with things like the Knowledge Graph, Search Plus Your World, and now the Gmail results, which are in opt-in field trial mode. Google is showing more direct answers, and on a larger number of SERPs, it’s showing less organic results. In fact, Google is reportedly even testing SERPs with less organic results than previously thought.

It’s not all about ads (though Google’s revenue certainly is).

Hat tip to Barry Schwartz for pointing to the Hacker News thread.

Do you think Google is showing too few organic results? Let us know what you think.

Google’s Matt Cutts On Why Ads Can Be More Helpful Than Organic Results
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  • http://www.veselinstoilov.com Veselin Stoilov

    It’s good that Google team thinks that ads are actually helping people find what they are looking for. In fact I will agree with that – often you can find better results in the ads than in the actual search results.

    Also, do not forget that companies/people who pay for ads are probably more likely to provide useful content/product/service – the point is whether or not the user will see the right ads. So, I personally do not mind seeing some ads. Maybe an option to select if you want to turn them on or off will be useful. Or when you do a search to have a filter to show the results without any ads.

    Veselin Stoilov
    Stiva Soft

  • Leffa

    It’s your privacy, it’s your choice

    I don’t know why people bother with google any more. Not only is the space dedicated to ads seemingly increasing, but google will “tailor” results depending on your past search history – how arrogant!

    DuckDuckGo.com (no, I am not affiliated with it in any way) will not track your search history nor will it filter the results. See the following explanations of how these policy decisions affect you if you are still using google to do your web searching:
    http://donttrack.us/
    http://dontbubble.us/

    As for Google+, despite google’s financial muscle, it was dead at birth. I confidently expect Google+ to wither and die a slow death.

    As for gmail, aka gmail, I wouldn’t go near it, google can electronically snoop on the contents of each and every email that you send via gmail and use the information gained for its own future marketing.

    On the other hand, DuckDuckGo takes the approach to not collect any personal information whatsoever.
    http://duckduckgo.com/privacy.html

  • http://www.rapidqueue.com Rapid Queue

    I agree that ads can be helpful–especially for retail searches with high commercial intent–but even with a high CTR, you’ll still grabbing only a small fraction of the traffic; people stop paying attention to ads after a while, and despite what they’d love everyone to think, Google is no different.

    Sure, his example works, but companies that aren’t the size of AT&T, I don’t think it’s as relevant. Organic > Paid until the CTR metrics show otherwise.

    • http://www.brickmarketing.com/ Nick Stamoulis

      You make a good point about ads for retail searches with high commercial intent being valuable, but those really are only a small fraction of the ads out there and represent and even small percentage of the clicks. I was actually having a discussion with someone the other day and we talked about how long it has been since we intentionally clicked on an ad in the search results. The instances were few and far in between.

  • http://www.foundationdigital.com.au Pamela

    I am a little sceptical about the recent Google changes and have found in general the search results are producing less relevant results. Carefully managed adwords can provide a useful tool, but organic search results are by far the best way of generating high value leads.

  • http://www.coordinatedseo.com D. Leno

    Ok, Bing! Here’s your opening!! Take it! Run. RUN!!!

  • http://www.remoteworkersonline.com/ Richard

    There are value in ads – after all why pay for something that will not provide the person looking with what they want?

    The problem Matt Cutts needs to realise is that people expect Google to provide relevant results. If it stops doing that it could well end up another Alta Vista.

    It also needs to stick with its “Don’t Be Evil” motto otherwise it will end up as just another money grabbing corporate in the eyes of its users and lose brand loyalty.

  • http://www.solidradicle.com Solid Radicle

    Matt Cutt; What happened to you? I wished you were more logical.

  • Robert Blueford

    Google Ads ON or OFF function is the best option, until it dies of irrelevance

  • https://canadaseopro.ca Todd

    “He notes that there are “tons of searches” where Google doesn’t show ads.”

    I would like to see comparison ratio on this.

  • http://www.coldone.com Rob

    I have operated a web based B to B and B to C business since 1999. The initial placement on Google and Yahoo!for key words was a challenge and I learned through study and trial and error to become proficient in pay for click advertising and SEO.

    My experience has shown the pay for click Google ads produced a very large amount of traffic, however I cannot quantify that the paid traffic quality was anywhere near the expense.

    I now do not utilize any paid advertising on Google after several years of paying $24,000-$50,000 annually. The net result? Lower traffic, almost exactly the same amount of conversions. Gains in conversions have come from strategic blog placement and other SEO tools to continue presence on 1st page organic search by selective key words.

    Early on, I used paid advertising for keywords that I couldn’t get first page placement organically. That again proved to drive traffic that generally did not produce profitable conversions.

    Google pay for click advertising has become increasingly more of an expense than a profit center for my business.

    Costs aside, the organic traffic appears to be more qualified than the paid ads.

    Personally, when I search Google for a keyword I always click on the organic results and then if I cannot find what I am looking for, will click on the paid ads.

    I think I am typical.

  • http://workthedirt.com Dean Williams

    I never click the ads at the top or the side of the page, in most cases they lead to a generic link page and not exactly what is in the ad, and they almost certainly are not the best choice when finding out the information you need to know, they are more sales oriented. I always go 2-5 spots down the organic list because they seem to have the information I need.

  • http://www.macgames.info Penguinized

    I have noticed that sometimes i don’t have the colored rectangle behind the ads anymore, is google slowly switching to “hiding” the ads so that they look like real results ? That would surely result in more clicks, so more money for google in the short run…

  • http://darrylmanco.com Darryl Manco

    AdWords is not as simple as buying one’s way onto first page RE. KWs and their QS, whether broad, phrase, or exact match, depend on landing page optimization for that particular KW or phrase. This ideology is expressed numerous times in their certification program; additionally, Google tracks when a user clicks on an ad then bounces back due to deficient relevance for the searcher. A similar methodology is also used when a searches bounces back to search after clicking on an organic result too. Gone are the days past, and today’s searcher wants to pull exactly what they are in search for. AdWords as a marketing tool gives businesses leverage for optimizing brand exposure for relevant search queries based on product/service marketed. Furthermore, Google’s organic purification through penguin shouts that Google wants website owners to create usable content with KW, which have context for the content unmindful whether the landing page is organic or paid.

  • http://allbrands-hottubandspa.com Steve

    Paid ads have no credibility ! I always feel that if GOOGLE did not
    think that the page was worth ranking in the search results then I
    certainly have no desire to visit the page.

  • http://www.r-evolution-tv.com/ Henri H

    I think it is a shame it is going in this direction. Of course Google needs to make money but one thing i have always liked about the fairness of the results. Whether you have a million dollar marketing budget or you are a small/start up business you could always compete, trust me, i have done it for many years and i stayed at the top BECAUSE i put in the time and effort (because i didn’t have the big marketing budget) i always did well with this fair system but now i am not sure anymore.

  • http://www.thebestword.net Genevieve

    I would not advise anyone to use Google Adwords in the way their sales promotion people are told to set them up for their clients. It’s a waste of money. The girl who called me set up my account so that it would pull the ad down after two or three people had clicked on the ad. This meant that my ad ran for 15 minutes at a time, when it was pulled down till the next day. As a result of that foolishness, one person called to inquire about my service – I am a freelance writer – and I was charged $100 dollars.

    Any good business man knows that you need at least 20 queries on yur services in order to get one or possibly two clients. If I went along with the way Google set up their ads, I would be shelling out $100 for each query. Hardly a paying situation.

  • http://www.wssmedia.com Chris Weller

    Ths is just more confirmation of the way google are playing with the search results for their own gain. We all have a business to run but their module was set up to provide the correct results for search queries and the organic ones are more likley to provide the correct information for search queries (if this wasn’t the case the ppc ads would have a higher CTRright?) the organic results receive a much higher CTR than the sponsored listings….so why provide searchers with information that they don’t want! I wish another search engine would come along and compete with Google as they are becoming arigant beyond belief. Hay what happens to their old mission statement is….
    “to organize the world’s information and make it universally accessible and useful….at least they are true to the word organise above as they sure are organising the results…around ppc!

  • NoGoggle

    My own experience with Google is very little ROI and amazingly high priced ads even with little competition. You can’t run cheap ads on google. Everything ended up nearly 5 dollars a click and no leads.

    Google needs to be investigated across all its businesses. These guys have no credibility with me. I think they game everything possible and outright lie about many things. They have excellent attorneys and they make many political contributions.

    I received 19 cents from a class action Adwords suit just a few months ago. 19 Cents. Looks like the suit did well. I never have heard anymore about the link farms clicking the ads. These ads are so vulnerable to fraud with their ad networks. Google squashed it.

    I think free enterprise is at risk with Google being unregulated. Just look at their new “privacy” setup so only Adwords campaigns shows you the keywords the user clicked with. What a completely absurd idea. Matt Cutts seems like a nice guy but he works for an evil greedy company. Matt could be a presidential spokesman one day!

    I’m seriously debating just bailing on Google entirely… I know it may sound crazy but they are getting way too greedy. Their new CEO has really turned the company into a greedy unethical beast (or maybe I’m just seeing it now :)) I’m going to write my representatives! I hope you do the same.

  • http://bayrvpark.com Frank

    I believe that my site half of its results from organic searches and half from adwords.

  • http://www.thebestword.net Genevieve

    Building up your website’s reputation organically is time consuming and it can be expensive. For the business person who does not have the time or energy to set up blogs, as well as posting on everyone else’ blog, and to arrange his website in whatever esoteric pattern it takes to attract Google’s attention. a few well-placed Google ads can be very helpful – until they get to be too expensive.

  • http://damescribe.hubpages.com/ Gin

    In doing a search, I prefer information that is ‘exact’ or near that, to my query, as do others. I’m doing research and would want to see reports from blah blah university or other high institution rather than a ad. Adverts should be relegated off to the side and not part of search queries. Information from quality institutions should be the norm delivered for the public. Ads on the side for businesses which may be noted. Also, content providers carry adverts for businesses but have been shuffled off to the dungeons and may prove no longer viable for businesses.

  • http://www.gridvirt.com Gridvirt

    I do not agree at all that ads are more helpful that organic results. In fact I find they are much worse. Not in terms of how they well they relate to the actual search but in quality of service provided.

    I have consistently found that companies listed in googles ads are of a lower quality than those listed in the first 4-6 organic results. I believe that companies rely on those ads for traffic rather than focusing on service and than own real SEO/Marketing efforts. I don’t even see those ads anymore and for at least a few years I have not clicked on a single one of them.

    • http://www.babyjog.com Roberto Zamora

      LMAO

  • ricky rick

    Matt Cutts is an assclown sellin’ ads for the man.

  • http://www.solutions-marketing-internet.ca/ Stef

    Lots of funny people here…

    Peoples that say Adwords does not work or is to expensive or does not converse well is only cause they don’t have GOOD CAMPAIGNS (But they all think they do and they all think that Adwords is easy and they know everything about it)WRONG, if someone say Adwords does not work, it is for SURE that they are far from knowing AdWords. I been working with very high competitive keywords with many clients and everyone is very happy. I’ve been an AdWords expert for a long time and it’s crasy to see all the money company spend for nothing.

    A GOOD EXEMPLE : Make a search on Google with «Hotels for free» or Hotels on planet Mars» and you will see all the big companies in AdWords results ??? How can that be ?

    Most company on AdWords are sending 25% of their money to TRASH. And believe me… That is true. With that 25% you could get a lots of new sales…

    But most peoples and companies just don’t care about it and want believe it anyways.

    Good Evening to everyone !

    Stef from Montreal

  • http://www.makerfurnitureplans.com Brian from Sydney

    Advertising is a method whereby any tosser with a few bucks can buy blurb space on a whore tabloid. Easy stuff with zero guarantees of any quality.
    A ‘public search engine’ is supposed to be serving their users but over the years Google has decided to cash in on the billions spent in advertising and want a huge share. They in fact are 100% fucussed on being a whore.
    Any dedicated researcher will eventually track down what they seek….all Google hopes to achieve is some free click-cash as we all struggle along. Heck, they don’t even care about their space buyers at the end of the day. A very dangerous entity is Google.
    Personally, I am waiting for the day that Firefox creates a public search engine so the whores can move on.
    I NEVER click adverts. I NEVER buy ad space from Google, not because I have irrelevant products or it wouldn’t help my sales, but simply because Google grab too big a slice and employ an auction based pricing system.
    Is this designed to produce greatest revenue for Google or structured to help the searcher and advertiser? Sort of answers itself doesn’t it? Google are but middlemen whores in the middle of a forced transaction.

  • http://www.netprofitmarketing.com/cleveland/ jared

    This is a big difference from what they used to say when Google was just started.

  • http://www.babyjog.com Roberto Zamora

    I feel that the natural search results are more fruitful than the add. The average human being thrives on achievement of their own results rather than being forced to a result.

  • Shorty

    It sucks that Google is reducing organic search results. Maybe they should separate there search engine into two, one for organic and one for ads. That way they can use 100% of their pages for ads. I’ll bet they get way less traffic on the ads search engine. I don’t click any of the ads either. A lot of them look spammy to me.

  • http://www.traveltext.cooloola.net Rod

    Like other poster here, I avoid the paid ads since they rarely give me the results I require.

    Lately on my Chrome browser I can hardly make out the shading behind the Adwords ads that indicate their paid for status.

    Good luck to Google for making billions from advertising, but if they kill the goose that lays the golden egg by further corrupting the organic search results I and others will search elsewhere.

  • Mike

    Webmasters are scrambling to recover from lost organic traffic and searchers are increasingly finding crappier results.
    Google’s ad revenue is at an all time high.
    Now you know why they rolled out Penguin and soon, Penguin 2.0

  • John

    i can only launch from this matt cutts speech. but at least we know what the updates will be soon at google. more adwords everywhere, top5 organic cheat, etc.

  • Toto

    Get back at Google by dumping Chrome and using SWIron which is based on Chromium or Firefox with “adblock” addon installed. Tell everybody you know about it. No more freaking ads; not even on Youtube.

  • Raj

    Thanks for the enlightenment, Matt. I really am enlightened now. Wow.

  • http://damonostrander.com Damon Ostrander

    I am gradually finding Google’s search results less and less efficient in terms of providing the information I want because it is now overwhelmingly ads. Usually when I search I don’t want the results I see to be influenced by paid positioning, but rather RELEVANCE. I think Google is taking its position as the #1 search engine for granted and is becoming vulnerable to displacement by an upstart engine that gives more relevant results and fewer ads.

  • http://www.futurepocket.com Hasan Khan

    Google has become pretty bad these days with the results it produces for search queries. I’m never able to find anything remotely relevant to my searches — it’s really annoying.

    Some time ago, before the Penguin update, you would see a site with “bad” links at the top but they were still sites of good content and quality… now a days its crap search results and “relevant” ads.

  • http://www.strategicrevenue.com John Colascione

    Google is going to have to tread carefully becuase if the opinion of consumers gets even remotely close to that articles title people will navigate away, slowely but surely, they will and it can happen, even to Google. It is very important that consumers to do not start feeling like Google presents all ads and nothing but ads becuase that will become a big problem, even if not entirely correct. I am not surprised Cutts came out with a responce on that.

  • max

    Would say in general all is nice, but google fails to supply content relative ads in about 60% of the pages. i guess this Mr. Cutts never looked to a few webpages and looked if they are content relativ. It continuously tells me that this google people spread out certain bla bla but never checked the relation to reality, they are “between mountain view and the moon”, totally detached from the real world its just a continuous stream of non relevant letters where the first letter has nothing to do with second etc. it fatally remainds my to alta vista about 10 years ago, almost exactly the same relevance, now the choice of search is bing, they do business, google does ideology, see the difference?

  • Urgh

    ads can be as helpful as the search results in some cases

    Especially true if you keep introducing algorithm changes that lower the quality of the organic result set. Crappy organics == More ad clicks.

    Check the last few quarterly results announcements from Google, and you’ll see an interesting trend where ad revenue is growing at a faster rate than overall visitors.

  • Jay

    Google are blatently reducing the quality of organic results in order to drive more paid traffic.

    Why else would they remove host crowding which a couple of years earlier their own tests showed users preferred?

    On some searches the first three pages are covered by the same site.

    Then there are the worthless scrapes they funnel you into, for example a navigational search for my local cinema duped me into clicking into googles wafer thin scrape of the cinemas show times. No trailers, no special offers, no content, no images… utter garbage.

    Now whe i search from my phone google intercept my requests and tell me that there is a problem with sites I know render perfectly well and invite me to go back to google and maybe click a ppc ad. If they can parse the site they completely mangle it. Either way on my phone i have to continually load google scrape, scroll down and click “view site directly”.

    I have not switched to bing entirely, but I am using it a lot more, its a hell of a lot better for finding solutions to specific problems.

    There is another element to this which is Google are flogging off their competetive advantage over bing which are (were) the organic results. Where ads take up 80% of the page then the best run auction wins, and bing have a much better chance of beating google in a paid ppc auction than they do in organic.

    I honestly believe Googles best days are behind it now.

  • Extorted

    As a small store owner that has survived on organic results, thrived on organic results, dreading the day when the goons would knock on the door and ask for protection payment, that day is here.

    The only way that we show up in organic results is if we pay for product listings, a percentage on every item in our inventory. It isn’t supposed to be that way, they don’t claim it works that way, but if we don’t pay for adwords product listings campaign, we don’t show up in organic results.

    I light a candle every night hoping that a giant sinkhole, at least the size of the one in Guatemala, opens up under the Google campus. I don’t like being jerked around, especially with their ever changing and arbitrary requirements on product feed. Thugs, thugs and thieves.

  • Susan

    The paid ads are a joke, for the most part. I hardly even use Google anymore because everything is so out of balance. Google is also being incredibly deceiving, making their paid ads at the top look just like the organic listings. They have eliminated the box that used to go around the top paid ads. Now they also make sure they have three ads at the top always….or almost always, which in the past you had to bid high enough to get that placement. To me, Google is getting desperate. They know that Facebook is way ahead of them when it comes to ad placement. When Google released their numbers last quarter they bragged about how their ad clicks had jumped nearly 50%……I wonder why. One thing I have learned about Google ads when I have ran my own campaign is that it’s almost better to give that money to someone who needs it. I have ran ads and paid thousands of dollars and gotten nothing because 75% (maybe more) of the time it’s your competitors who click the ads, the other times are usually just various clicks, or Google hopes you don’t define your search keywords so they can place your ad in tons of slightly unrelated searches. Google also acts like their algorithm is so advanced, but it is NOT. I have ran countless tests putting stats and numbers that no one else has, or the newest information week after week and Google still keeps those sites that run on autopilot at the top….and I already have high ranking sites, so it’s not like I am trying to rank at all…..I already rank. What I think their latest Panda and Penguin updates were really about is making sure they’re golden egg (paid ads) was protected by blurring the lines of paid / organic and keeping three ads at the top at all times. By doing the updates and acting like their algorithm was doing this advanced job they are trying to fool everyone. What they really thought was how do we get people to start wasting their money on paid ads again. Then it came to them, change up the rankings. Bring some of the people who were lower in the rankings, bring them up because they already know it’s a waste to spend money on paid ads. Then bring some of the people who ranked highly down in the rankings so they can start throwing their money away on paid ads…….they’ll do it because they were used to good placement and they will be desperate. The people who couldn’t rank at the top already knew that it’s a waste to spend money on Google ads. Google is dying. They had to tap into everyone’s privacy because they were so far behind Facebook because Facebook has been dropping cookies on your computer for years so they know exactly what you and the world like. Google knows they are backed into a corner and they are trying to act like they’re still way ahead of the pack. But they are not. I am not saying that Google is going away anytime soon but they are going to do everything they can to make sure people aren’t on to their demise for as long as they can….and why wouldn’t they? Because if everything is revealed for what it really is, their stock will plummet. If Facebook was smart they would invest a little in their search engine and put a fork in Google.

  • This is not the TRUTH

    SUPER SUSAN! JOKE! Absolutely! Google have many problems, they need very important money… all projects failed… they lost many money with google plus and so on. the last thing they earn money is their searchengine. and they want no seo they want sponsored search… so we can understand the reason, why matt say this. but this is not the TRUTH. and if somebody dont say the truth or try to manipulate the truth, this is maybe the end of google. they lost a lot of user… me too. and never forget that we webmasters had make google gig… THANK YOU GOOGLE… we will see in future, that the google stock will massive plummet! DONT BUY!!!!!!!!!!!

  • http://www.hispacar.com Hispacar

    If the quality of organic results returned by Google is getting worse (many webmasters will agree on this, although Google obviously doesn’t), the add revenue will increase automatically as people start clicking the adds to find a good result.

  • Gunj

    Funny, I cannot ever remember doing a Google search in which not one Google ad appeared, with reference to Cutts claiming there are “tons of searches” where Google does not show ads. What planet is he from?

  • http://www.webmarkt.ro/ Moustache

    It will come a time when Goolge will fill the entire page with paid ads.
    I think it is very close that day.

  • http://www.frankel-realty.com/ Thomas

    I am split between the two. I hate to see paid ads growing. That means the guy with the most money wins. But in the other hand, those targeted ads are in most cases the best match for the searcher.

  • Tony

    Its clear Google is heading the direction of charging everyone for everything and just tack it on to what your customer already pays. So much for low prices.

  • Tony

    Paid ads do not work if you do not over charge your customers or cant overcharge due to competition and yes we tried Adwords and Boy Google made 5 times more than we did due to the high price of keywords and we would have had to raise prices so high to pay for it we would have been out of business. Did anyone bother to tell Google the economy is in terrible shape.

    Every customer I speak with tells me they had no clue the paid listings at the top and right of the Google serch result page are paid clicks and they click those all the time just look. Google certainly does not want the normal browser or shoipper to know they are secretly making money for Google and causing the company to spend more money there by causing their own prices to increase. All so Google can make millions more after all organic search results do not make them a penny. Its all about the money now!

  • Denise

    If Google’s search only display 18% of organic results then they should stop referring to themselves as a search engine.

  • http://blog-media.net Blog Media

    Well hasn’t he failed then as in making search results better?

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