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Google Algorithm Updates Announced: Panda Gets More Sensitive

Will Panda now be even pickier about your content?

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Google Algorithm Updates Announced: Panda Gets More Sensitive
[ Business]

I wasn’t expecting this to come until early March, since the month isn’t even over yet, but Google has gone ahead and released its monthly list of updates: 40 changes for February.

While we’ll take a deeper look into the list soon, it’s worth noting right off the bat that there is a Panda update listed. Late last week, in light of Panda’s one-year anniverary, I asked Google if the Panda adjustment from January’s list had been the most recent adjustment to Panda. The response I received from a spokesperson was:

“We improved how Panda interacts with our indexing and ranking systems, making it more integrated into our pipelines. We also released a minor update to refresh the data for Panda.”

This was basically what the company said in January. Now, in today’s list for February, Google says:

“This launch refreshes data in the Panda system, making it more accurate and more sensitive to recent changes on the web.”

So between January’s and February’s Panda news, it sounds like Panda is more ingrained into how Google indexes the web than ever before, and may even be pickier about quality.

Here’s the full list in Google’s words:

  • More coverage for related searches. [launch codename “Fuzhou”] This launch brings in a new data source to help generate the “Searches related to” section, increasing coverage significantly so the feature will appear for more queries. This section contains search queries that can help you refine what you’re searching for.
  • Tweak to categorizer for expanded sitelinks. [launch codename “Snippy”, project codename “Megasitelinks”] This improvement adjusts a signal we use to try and identify duplicate snippets. We were applying a categorizer that wasn’t performing well for our expanded sitelinks, so we’ve stopped applying the categorizer in those cases. The result is more relevant sitelinks.
  • Less duplication in expanded sitelinks. [launch codename “thanksgiving”, project codename “Megasitelinks”] We’ve adjusted signals to reduce duplication in the snippets forexpanded sitelinks. Now we generate relevant snippets based more on the page content and less on the query.
  • More consistent thumbnail sizes on results page. We’ve adjusted the thumbnail size for most image content appearing on the results page, providing a more consistent experience across result types, and also across mobile and tablet. The new sizes apply to rich snippet results for recipes and applications, movie posters, shopping results, book results, news results and more.
  • More locally relevant predictions in YouTube. [project codename “Suggest”] We’ve improved the ranking for predictions in YouTube to provide more locally relevant queries. For example, for the query [lady gaga in ] performed on the US version of YouTube, we might predict [lady gaga in times square], but for the same search performed on the Indian version of YouTube, we might predict [lady gaga in India].
  • More accurate detection of official pages. [launch codename “WRE”] We’ve made an adjustment to how we detect official pages to make more accurate identifications. The result is that many pages that were previously misidentified as official will no longer be.
  • Refreshed per-URL country information. [Launch codename “longdew”, project codename “country-id data refresh”] We updated the country associations for URLs to use more recent data.
  • Expand the size of our images index in Universal Search. [launch codename “terra”, project codename “Images Universal”] We launched a change to expand the corpus of results for which we show images in Universal Search. This is especially helpful to give more relevant images on a larger set of searches.
  • Minor tuning of autocomplete policy algorithms. [project codename “Suggest”] We have a narrow set of policies for autocomplete for offensive and inappropriate terms. This improvement continues to refine the algorithms we use to implement these policies.
  • “Site:” query update [launch codename “Semicolon”, project codename “Dice”] This change improves the ranking for queries using the “site:” operator by increasing the diversity of results.
  • Improved detection for SafeSearch in Image Search. [launch codename "Michandro", project codename “SafeSearch”] This change improves our signals for detecting adult content in Image Search, aligning the signals more closely with the signals we use for our other search results.
  • Interval based history tracking for indexing. [project codename “Intervals”] This improvement changes the signals we use in document tracking algorithms.
  • Improvements to foreign language synonyms. [launch codename “floating context synonyms”, project codename “Synonyms”] This change applies an improvement we previously launched for English to all other languages. The net impact is that you’ll more often find relevant pages that include synonyms for your query terms.
  • Disabling two old fresh query classifiers. [launch codename “Mango”, project codename “Freshness”] As search evolves and new signals and classifiers are applied to rank search results, sometimes old algorithms get outdated. This improvement disables two old classifiers related to query freshness.
  • More organized search results for Google Korea. [launch codename “smoothieking”, project codename “Sokoban4”] This significant improvement to search in Korea better organizes the search results into sections for news, blogs and homepages.
  • Fresher images. [launch codename “tumeric”] We’ve adjusted our signals for surfacing fresh images. Now we can more often surface fresh images when they appear on the web.
  • Update to the Google bar. [project codename “Kennedy”] We continue to iterate in our efforts to deliver a beautifully simple experience across Google products, and as part of that this month we made further adjustments to the Google bar. The biggest change is that we’ve replaced the drop-down Google menu in the November redesign with a consistent and expanded set of links running across the top of the page.
  • Adding three new languages to classifier related to error pages. [launch codename "PNI", project codename "Soft404"] We have signals designed to detect crypto 404 pages (also known as “soft 404s”), pages that return valid text to a browser but the text only contain error messages, such as “Page not found.” It’s rare that a user will be looking for such a page, so it’s important we be able to detect them. This change extends a particular classifier to Portuguese, Dutch and Italian.
  • Improvements to travel-related searches. [launch codename “nesehorn”] We’ve made improvements to triggering for a variety of flight-related search queries. These changes improve the user experience for our Flight Search feature with users getting more accurate flight results.
  • Data refresh for related searches signal. [launch codename “Chicago”, project codename “Related Search”] One of the many signals we look at to generate the “Searches related to” section is the queries users type in succession. If users very often search for [apple] right after [banana], that’s a sign the two might be related. This update refreshes the model we use to generate these refinements, leading to more relevant queries to try.
  • International launch of shopping rich snippets. [project codename “rich snippets”]Shopping rich snippets help you more quickly identify which sites are likely to have the most relevant product for your needs, highlighting product prices, availability, ratings and review counts. This month we expanded shopping rich snippets globally (they were previously only available in the US, Japan and Germany).
  • Improvements to Korean spelling. This launch improves spelling corrections when the user performs a Korean query in the wrong keyboard mode (also known as an “IME”, or input method editor). Specifically, this change helps users who mistakenly enter Hangul queries in Latin mode or vice-versa.
  • Improvements to freshness. [launch codename “iotfreshweb”, project codename “Freshness”] We’ve applied new signals which help us surface fresh content in our results even more quickly than before.
  • Web History in 20 new countries. With Web History, you can browse and search over your search history and webpages you’ve visited. You will also get personalized search results that are more relevant to you, based on what you’ve searched for and which sites you’ve visited in the past. In order to deliver more relevant and personalized search results, we’ve launched Web History in Malaysia, Pakistan, Philippines, Morocco, Belarus, Kazakhstan, Estonia, Kuwait, Iraq, Sri Lanka, Tunisia, Nigeria, Lebanon, Luxembourg, Bosnia and Herzegowina, Azerbaijan, Jamaica, Trinidad and Tobago, Republic of Moldova, and Ghana. Web History is turned on only for people who have a Google Account and previously enabled Web History.
  • Improved snippets for video channels. Some search results are links to channels with many different videos, whether on mtv.com, Hulu or YouTube. We’ve had a feature for a while now that displays snippets for these results including direct links to the videos in the channel, and this improvement increases quality and expands coverage of these rich “decorated” snippets. We’ve also made some improvements to our backends used to generate the snippets.
  • Improvements to ranking for local search results. [launch codename “Venice”] This improvement improves the triggering of Local Universal results by relying more on the ranking of our main search results as a signal.
  • Improvements to English spell correction. [launch codename “Kamehameha”] This change improves spelling correction quality in English, especially for rare queries, by making one of our scoring functions more accurate.
  • Improvements to coverage of News Universal. [launch codename “final destination”] We’ve fixed a bug that caused News Universal results not to appear in cases when our testing indicates they’d be very useful.
  • Consolidation of signals for spiking topics. [launch codename “news deserving score”, project codename “Freshness”] We use a number of signals to detect when a new topic is spiking in popularity. This change consolidates some of the signals so we can rely on signals we can compute in realtime, rather than signals that need to be processed offline. This eliminates redundancy in our systems and helps to ensure we can continue to detect spiking topics as quickly as possible.
  • Better triggering for Turkish weather search feature. [launch codename “hava”] We’ve tuned the signals we use to decide when to present Turkish users with the weather search feature. The result is that we’re able to provide our users with the weather forecast right on the results page with more frequency and accuracy.
  • Visual refresh to account settings page. We completed a visual refresh of the account settings page, making the page more consistent with the rest of our constantly evolving design.
  • Panda update. This launch refreshes data in the Panda system, making it more accurate and more sensitive to recent changes on the web.
  • Link evaluation. We often use characteristics of links to help us figure out the topic of a linked page. We have changed the way in which we evaluate links; in particular, we are turning off a method of link analysis that we used for several years. We often rearchitect or turn off parts of our scoring in order to keep our system maintainable, clean and understandable.
  • SafeSearch update. We have updated how we deal with adult content, making it more accurate and robust. Now, irrelevant adult content is less likely to show up for many queries.
  • Spam update. In the process of investigating some potential spam, we found and fixed some weaknesses in our spam protections.
  • Improved local results. We launched a new system to find results from a user’s city more reliably. Now we’re better able to detect when both queries and documents are local to the user.

More analysis to come.

Google Algorithm Updates Announced: Panda Gets More Sensitive
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  • givesuccess

    Translation – “Last year we screwed everything up and now we are trying to fix it all!” They just can’t stop and let the dust settle can they?

    • http://www.LAokay.com Steve G

      That’s basically how I see all these changes that Google does. Google screwed up bad and now feels necessary to tell the public just what it’s been up to and what they can expect. Remember when nobody really cared what minor changes that Google made to it’s algorithm because everybody felt it wasn’t perfect, but closer to perfect than anybody had achieved so far? That’s all gone now. Google is now being compared to Bing and Yahoo as a second rate search engine.

  • http://www.replica-sunglasses.co.uk/mens-sunglasses/ Lisa

    HI,

    I don’t get this
    “we are turning off a method of link analysis that we used for several years”

    Will that mean that link building is dead?
    Won’t google rank on the basis of links ?

    • http://www.miningequipmentsupplier.com Wade

      That figures. Just when I’m starting to halfway understand how the algorithm works, they up and change it on me. Surely link recognition will not be totally thrown out. Google Analytics says that they are stopping on ranking links for the average number of links that u have, and rank for the one that is in the first position…whatever that means! Geez….

  • http://www.onlinehandles.com/ rosa

    Hmmm ! panda becomes more smarter day by day..

  • http://www.brickmarketing.com/search-engine-optimization-firm.htm Nick Stamoulis

    As long as you are following a white hat SEO strategy and distributing quality content there is no reason to worry. It’s impossible to analyze every little change that Google makes, since there are simply so many. Doing so will just drive you crazy.

  • google-ash

    Google………..full of BS. Don’t use this site for your search. No better in accuracy, more ads (upper-midle-lower and side-area). I hate the search results. Let people know how business-oriented this search engine ash.

  • http://ibrandyou.eu Alfredo Almeida

    More and more Google gives less relevance to PR (Page Ranking). Even if you have a link on a reputable site, Google may or may not follow that link. Depends if that link is relevant to the user.
    (@Alf_Almeida)

  • baines

    Biggest BAD change was the removal of the ‘search within results’ button on the results page, and the second BAD change was the removal of the specificity usage of inverted commas/quotes when searching – now anything comes up however distantly related to the item wanted.

  • http://aplawrence.com Tony Lawrence

    Well, Panda knocked me down a lot and oddly enough I wonder if Webpronews is part of it.

    Years ago, I had all my articles copyleft – that’s what most of us thought was the right thing to do back then. I have since changed that policy, but of course a lot of my older stuff is out on other websites – including quite a big pile at Webpronews, coincidentally enough.

    So, the question is, does this upset Google? Should I tell WPN (and a number of other sites) to remove all of the content they copied from me back when I was allowing that? Does it matter? For example, WPN has about 575 pages of mine (out of some 3800 or so) – do I care? Does Panda care?

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