Dropbox Gets Google-Like Two-Step Verification

By: Chris Crum - August 27, 2012

Dropbox announced today that it is launching a new two-step verification feature to make the service more secure. It requires two levels of authentication to log in: a password, and a security code that will either be texted to the user’s phone or generated by a mobile authenticator app for iOS, Android, Blackberry and Windows 7.

Many Google users are familiar with this type of system, which it made available to all users in February 2011. It got some attention earlier this month, thanks to the highly publicized hacking of Wired writer Mat Honan, who acknowledged that had he set up the feature, much of his trouble could have possibly been avoided.

Google’s Matt Cutts blogged about it dispelling some myths.

“Turning on two-step verification is simple,” Dropbox’s Dan Wheeler says of the new feature. “Go to the new Security tab in your Dropbox account settings and enable two-step verification in the ‘Account sign in’ section.”

“From there, just follow the steps to set up two-step verification,” he adds. “Detailed setup instructions are also available in our Help Center. On your desktop or mobile devices, you’ll only need the code the first time you sign in to Dropbox. On the web, you can also select the option to “Trust this computer” and you won’t need to re-enter a code again.”

In addition to two-step verification, Dropbox also now has away to view all active logins to your account through the Security tab. The company says it is also working on automated mechanisms to identify suspicious activity.

Chris Crum

About the Author

Chris CrumChris Crum has been a part of the WebProNews team and the iEntry Network of B2B Publications since 2003. Follow Chris on Twitter, on StumbleUpon, on Pinterest and/or on Google: +Chris Crum.

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  • Terry

    It’s nice to see another company giving users the perfect balance between security and user experience by implementing 2FA which allows us to telesign into our accounts. I know some will claim this make things more complicated, but the slight inconvenience each time you log in is worth the confidence of knowing your info is secure. I’m hoping that more companies start to offer this awesome functionality. This should be a prerequisite to any system that wants to promote itself as being secure.