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Center For Digital Democracy Articles

Consumer Groups Call For Stronger Online Privacy Measures

In response to a discussion draft of a new privacy bill now under consideration by the House Subcommittee on Communications, Technology and the Internet, ten privacy and consumer groups today called for stronger measures to protect consumer privacy both online and off.

Google Prepares To Hold Another D.C. Talk
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Sometimes, Google and the government get along; one week from today, for example, Google will host a gathering in Washington, D.C. to discuss national security and Web 2.0.  Relationships don’t always proceed smoothly, however, and two consumer watchdog groups have asked the president to decide against hiring a certain Googler.

Privacy Groups Protest Mobile Advertising Practices

A lot of things have prevented mobile advertising from becoming widespread; think phone tech, consumers’ reactions, and advertisers’ reluctance, to name a few.  Now, it looks like the list has grown longer, as the Center for Digital Democracy and the U.S. Public Interest Research Group have sent the FTC a formal complaint.

Law Firm Purges DoubleClick References
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The demand for the FTC chair to recuse herself from the Google and DoubleClick antitrust review yielded a surprising little twist.

CDD: Facebook’s Digital Mea Culpa Not Enough

The Center for Digital Democracy (CDD), which has filed a complaint against Facebook with the Federal Trade Commission because of privacy concerns, says CEO Mark Zuckerberg’s apology to Facebook users won’t make problems go away.

Digital Democracy Director Slams Google’s Greed
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At the moment, Google’s stock is slightly above $600, and the company has a market cap of $187.42 billion.  Given this evidence, it would be hard to say that Google doesn’t like money.  But one onlooker has called the search giant greedy and wonders if it will “ruin the Internet.”

FCC’s AT&T Concession Just Smoke and Mirrors?

The Center for Digital Democracy is decrying how excitement caused by Net Neutrality language being worked into the Federal Communications Commission’s approval of the AT&T/Bell South merger overshadowed another decision by the FCC showing favoritism to the telecommunications industry over local governments and communities.