PayPal Digital Goods Payment Product Released

Today at eBay’s 2001 Analyst Day, PayPal announced the general availability of its digital goods solution, aptly called PayPal for Digital Goods. 

The product is designed for online publishers. "The solution makes paying for content online convenient and secure for consumers, a long-time challenge for all sorts of digital content providers," a PayPal representative tells WebProNews.

Is Creating a Unique Experience Enough To Get People to Pay for Digital Content?

John Loughlin, Executive VP and GM of Hearst Magazines, which publishes Cosmopolitan, Esquire, Popular Mechanics, and other popular titles, provided an inside look into Hearst’s content strategy for the digital age here at ad:tech NY. 

Do you think Hearst’s success in traditional publishing will extend to triumph in the online world? Let us know in the comments section.

Here’s an Invitation to the New Digg

Digg is giving out invitations to the new Digg. Specifically, it’s giving out handfuls of invitations to publishers to offer to their readers.

"We want to see all publishers experience the same success, so we’re providing every publisher, big or small, with a chance to invite their readers to the new Digg, before our GA launch," says Michael Cieri.

Major Publishers Project $3 Billion in Digital Subscription Revenue by 2014

Next Issue Media, a digital publishing consortium made up of Condé Nast, Hearst, Meredith, News Corp., and Time, has revealed findings from a study on consumer demand for digital newspaper and magazine products. According to the consortium, $3 billion in subscription revenue is expected by 2014.

After accounting for potential cannibalization of some print subscriptions, the industry could realize $1.3 billion in incremental revenue, the consortium says.

Twitter Launches its Official Tweet Button

Twitter has launched its official Tweet button for publishers to place on their content. There are numerous unofficial buttons out there that publishers have been taking advantage of for quite a while, but now there’s one right from the company that counts tweets no matter how they were tweeted.

Actually, Twitter is working with TweetMeme on this one. TweetMeme has been offering probably the most popular version of the tweet button for publishers. Twitter says TweetMeme will be switching over to the official Twitter button anyway.

Amazon Offers New Royalty Program For Kindle Authors

Amazon.com said today it is now offering independent authors and publishers who use its ebook self-publishing program, the Kindle Digital Text Platform (DTP), a 70 percent royalty option.

For each book sold from the Kindle Store for Kindle, Kindle DX, or one of the Kindle apps for iPad, iPhone, iPod Touch, BlackBerry, PC, Mac and Android phones, authors and publishers who choose the new 70 percent royalty option will receive 70 percent of the list price, minus delivery costs.

 

Google Reveals AdSense Revenue Share, Is it Satisfactory?

Google has kept its AdSense revenue share numbers a secret for quite some time, but has now decided to disclose them – or at least some of them. They’ve revealed the percentages for AdSense for Content and AdSense for Search, but are remaining mum on some of the other offerings. Still, content and search are the two biggies.

Is Google’s revenue split better or worse than you expected? Let us know.

New York Times Paywall Loophole – Access Through Links

Back in January, the New York Times announced that it would be gravitating to a metered paywall system at the beginning of 2011. This would let readers access an as-of-yet unspecified number of articles for free each month, until requiring payment for further access. Meanwhile, print subscribers would have full access to content online.

Do You “Like” How Facebook Phrases Your Likes?

Now that most of the web is scrambling to get like buttons and/or recommend buttons on their sites, there is going to be more "liking" and "recommending" on Facebook than ever before. While users may like or recommend a piece of content, that does not necessarily mean they like or recommend what that piece of content is about.

Google Buzz Draws New Content-Scraping Controversy

Update 2:  Google offered the following statement: "Buzz can only expand to show whatever was in the underlying feed. For example, if an item is truncated in the feed to only include 200 characters, then Buzz will only show 200 characters."