Museum Of Natural History Launches iPhone App

The American Museum of Natural History in New York City has launched a free app for the iPhone, iPod touch and iPad called Explorer.

The Explorer app uses Wi-Fi to act as an "indoor GPS" within the museum, pinpointing a user’s location and offering turn-by-turn directions through more than 500,000 square feet that features 45 permanent exhibition halls, theaters, restrooms, cafs, and museum shops.

Microsoft Previews Street Slide Product

Privacy issues aside, it’s hard to complain too much about products like Bing Streetside and Google Street View, considering such tools were until recently nonexistent.  But Microsoft has previewed its next-generation mapping tool, dubbed Street Slide, and it promises to up the ante in several ways.

How Open Web Developers Are Trying to Make Social Media Better for You, the User

Last week, a new open protocol called OExchange was released with the aim of simplifying sharing. Right out of the door, it had names like Google, Microsoft, and LinkedIn signed on. WebProNews spoke with Google’s Open Web advocate, Chris Messina about how the protocol could benefit businesses and site owners.

Twitter Acquires Analytics Company Smallthought Systems

Twitter announced that it has acquired Smallthought Systems, the creators of Dabble DB, an online database Twitter has used in the past to track and share information about projects internally.

"Every day millions of people use Twitter to create, share and discover information, and as we grow, analytics becomes an increasingly crucial part of improving our service," says Twitter Analytics Lead Kevin Weil.

Do Google’s Direct Answers Improve Search Results?

Last year at its Searchology event, Google introduced Google Squared, the company’s Labs project aimed at building collections of facts from the web for any topic specified by the user. A year later (to the day), Google announced that Squared is already being integrated into its search engine.

What Facebook “Likes” Mean for Search & Reputation

It’s been nearly a week since Facebook rocked the world with its Open Graph announcements, and many of us are still wrapping our heads around all of the implications they have. I don’t think there’s any dispute that it’s a huge move, and that it’s important to pay attention to from a business perspective, but just what it means for businesses is still up in the air in some regards.

Startups Shouldn’t Necessarily Count on the Twitter Strategy

Early in the week, Twitter revealed its new "Promoted Tweets" feature, or ad platform (though the company doesn’t like calling it this), and essentially its long awaited business model. The jury is still out on how successful a business model this will be, but it’s already created a huge amount of buzz, and Twitter has grown enormously up until this point without a business model.

Migrating from Yahoo Search Marketing API to adCenter API

As you probably know, Microsoft and Yahoo have a search and advertising deal in place. Microsoft has now released a guide for migrating from the Yahoo Search Marketing API to its own adCenter API.

The guide is intended to explain how to develop ad campaigns and request reports in adCenter.

YouTube Readies “Thank You” For Traffic Contributors

Sites that send enough traffic to YouTube will soon start getting something in return.  A new "as seen on" feature will effectively thank significant sources of YouTube viewers, giving them credit – and a link – at the bottom of videos’ pages.

Developer Shares Story of Being Threatened by Facebook for Crawling

Pete Warden, a former software engineer at Apple, who is now working on his own start-up, posted an interesting story about how Facebook threatened to sue him for crawling the social network. I reached out to both Warden and Facebook for more details, but so far have only received response from Facebook, who calls  the incident as "violation of our terms."