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Web Surfing Beats Sex And Friendship

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A survey by ad agency JWT found many people prefer to click their way to happiness on the Internet rather than seek the company of friends or lovers.

It may be time for all of the jokes about being addicted to the Internet to take a break. People do feel strongly about having an available connection online.

A Yahoo News report cited JWT director of trend spotting, Ann Mack, on the findings of the company’s survey of 1,011 American adults. Mack said people feel “anxious, isolated, and bored” when they can’t go online:

“It is taking away from offline activities, among them having sex, socializing face-to-face, watching TV and reading newspapers and magazines. It cuts into that share,” said Mack.

“I don’t suppose their partners are too pleased about it.”

Such devotion to the cold flame of the monitor means other things have to give in people’s lives. According to JWT, people want even more of the Internet.

That demand will push greater adoption of mobile technology for wireless Internet access. People want to carry around their ability to feel connected to others, even if it is through packet data rather than conversations or, um, other things.

Web Surfing Beats Sex And Friendship
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  • http://www.blogschmog.net Kevin Makice

    I really don’t like these kinds of conclusions to these kinds of surveys. Internet is not a zero-sum proposition.

    Many sports fans, for example, surf for stats and chat with friends while watching their fantasy team players score touchdowns on television. Twitter is another good example. The hooks into that community through desktop applications, IM and mobile allow interaction to be a moment-of-interruption event, not something that takes away from other things going on.

    The internet is used more and more as a channel for information, nothing more. It is often the same kind of distraction a window with a view of a street would be in an office with no technology. Breaks and diversity are just as important to work process as the “work” part.

    I also highly doubt that a study where you put a naked person next to a computer with wireless would result in the same pecking order for the participant.

    Anxious about disconnection? Definitely. Preferred form of interaction? Doubtful.

    • Nikita G.

      Unlike Kevin, my generation does use online interactions more and for some of us, it really is our preferred form of conmmunication for the simple fact that you are able to express yourself than you could in an otherwise awkward stage in your life. I’ve met very good friends on the internet in real life by getting to know them whether on myspace, chats, etc.

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