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UK Interest In Blogs Stronger Than Ever

Record-setting traffic levels

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It’s a great time to run a UK-oriented blog.  UK traffic levels to blogs and personal sites have taken a couple of deep dips over the past few years, but according to new Hitwise data, visits have now risen and reached a record high.

Robin Goad found that "Blogs and Personal Websites accounted for 1.19% of all UK traffic, equivalent to one in every 84 internet visits" last week.  He later continues, "[O]ver the last 3 years UK Internet traffic to [our] Blogs and Personal Websites category has increased by 208%, compared to 70% for News and Media."

Hitwise UK Data
 Hitwise Data On Record-Setting Blog Traffic
Photo Credit:(Hitwise)

Blogs aren’t about to replace the BBC, of course; News and Media sites remain over five times as popular as those belonging in the Blogs and Personal Websites category.  Still, the BBC is adapting – its Blog Network is listed among the "20 most visited Blogs and Personal websites in the UK" – and it’s interesting to see the comparative increase, regardless.

Assuming nothing changes in the near future, we may now be in store for several straight weeks or months of blog-related record-breaking.  Companies not already catering to the UK (or at least not keeping a well-updated UK blog) may become more inclined to do so, and overall AdSense earnings in the region might grow a little bit.

For the record, the market share of blogs in America doesn’t compare well with that of blogs in the UK (0.73 percent vs. 1.09 percent, respectively).

UK Interest In Blogs Stronger Than Ever
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  • http://flowersbypost.blogspot.com/ norman

    Its particular interesting to see just how steep the climb is in traffic from July ’07 to date. There looked to have been a drop in traffic back in July/Aug ’06 aswell.

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