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Tim O’Reilly Articles

Which Payment Platform Will Dominate Mobile?
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A recent study found that consumers are getting more comfortable with mobile shopping, and you best believe that will only continue, as people continue to spend more of their web time on their phones. So as everybody reaches for their mobile devices to make payments, which platforms are they going to use?

O
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We (everybody, I’m guessing) are currently floating along the digital tide, peering out through the translucent and pliable—but potentially fragile—vistas of Web 2.0, the rubble of the revolution baking on a treeless island behind us, the glistening, mineral-rich sand of possibility strewn along the shoreline just over the lip of the bow—whichever direction the bow lay in a bubble.

O

We (everybody, I’m guessing) are currently floating along the digital tide, peering out through the translucent and pliable—but potentially fragile—vistas of Web 2.0, the rubble of the revolution baking on a treeless island behind us, the glistening, mineral-rich sand of possibility strewn along the shoreline just over the lip of the bow—whichever direction the bow lay in a bubble.

O

We (everybody, I’m guessing) are currently floating along the digital tide, peering out through the translucent and pliable—but potentially fragile—vistas of Web 2.0, the rubble of the revolution baking on a treeless island behind us, the glistening, mineral-rich sand of possibility strewn along the shoreline just over the lip of the bow—whichever direction the bow lay in a bubble.

O

We (everybody, I’m guessing) are currently floating along the digital tide, peering out through the translucent and pliable—but potentially fragile—vistas of Web 2.0, the rubble of the revolution baking on a treeless island behind us, the glistening, mineral-rich sand of possibility strewn along the shoreline just over the lip of the bow—whichever direction the bow lay in a bubble.

O’Reilly Turns Criticism Into Civil Discourse

After the uproar caused by his proposed code of conduct for bloggers, Tim O’Reilly could have let the subject drop into the deep waters of blogospheric controversy, only to be remembered as a cautionary tale, a footnote to the history of the Web.

Blogging Code of Conduct or Not?

Tim O’Reilly just posted the draft of a Blogger’s Code of Conduct that he’s hoping we all adopt. I instantly asked the mob hanging out on Twitter what they thought. Brett Nordquist had this funny thought:

O’Reilly Draws Up Blogging Code Policy

In the wake of the Kathy Sierra kerfuffle, there have been calls for a blogging code of ethics; the problem isn’t with bloggers, or even their blogs.

Tim OReilly’s Web 2.0 Report

Tim O’Reilly, the tech media titan who gave Web 2.0 its name and defined many of its characteristics in a seminal paper called What is Web 2.0, is peddling a new report called Web 2.0 Principles and Best Practices. The 101-page report was actually written by John Musser of Programmableweb.com, using O’Reilly’s original 5-page paper as the takeoff point.

O’Reilly Admits Mishandling Web 2.0 Issue

A post by O’Reilly Media regarding their cease and desist demand letter issued over the use of “Web 2.0″ in a conference name could have been handled better.