All Posts Tagged Tag: ‘Study’

Weight Loss Counseling Research Needed, Shows Study

As obesity rates in the U.S. continue to climb health researchers have begun to study many different factors that can affect weight. A new study suggests, however, that there may not be enough research into how doctors can encourage already-proven methods for weight loss. The study, published in The Journal of the American Medical Association, reviewed studies about how doctors …

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Global Warming Caused Mass Extinction 55 Million Years Ago, Shows Study

As politicians continue to debate climate change, researchers are hard at work trying to predict what humans can expect as the planet continues to warm. Even with plenty of research, the many variables involved in climate change make the future uncertain. What does seem certain, however, is that humans are ill-prepared. A recent study published in the journal Paleoceanography has …

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Weight Loss: Faster Diets Are Good Too, Shows Study

American adults are more obese than ever and still growing larger. It’s a problem that millions struggle with and one that helps make weight loss a billion-dollar industry. Though fad diet books are immensely popular, slow and steady weight loss has long been recommended by health professionals. Now new research is showing that quick-loss diets might actually have some merit. …

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Weight Loss Aided by Spinach Extract, Shows Study

For decades now advertising has promised to help people lose weight using a variety of products, but none of the pills, diets, or programs have ever proved to be the miracle product that consumers crave. As Americans continue to grow larger, however, even products that help a little could end up contributing significantly to public health. A new study published …

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Global Warming Made Worse by Human Eating Habits, Shows Study

In recent years reports on global warming have shifted away from firmly establishing a human connection to the phenomenon and have instead begun warning of the dire consequences humanity might face as a result of climate change. An Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) assessment report released in April of this year warned that humans are “ill-prepared” for climate change …

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Diabetes in Adolescents Linked to Antipsychotics

As the prevalence of diabetes around the world rises, more researchers are turning their attention to the disease and its possible causes. Some medical researchers are focusing their efforts on juvenile diabetes, research that may help to curb rising diagnoses of type 2 diabetes among adolescents. A new study published in this month’s issue of the Journal of the American …

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Weight Loss Harder For the Poor, Shows Study

As Americans continue to grow larger, the weight loss industry continues to rake in billions of dollars each year. Books, medications, meal programs, and diet gurus all sell solutions to the U.S. weight problem, but it now appears that weight-loss success may more difficult to achieve for Americans who are struggling financially. A new study published in the American Journal …

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Long-Term Care Needs Improvement For Dementia Patients, Shows Study

The baby boomer generation is now aging, a situation that is bringing with it a new set of challenges for the U.S. This demographic shift is being most strongly felt in the healthcare industry, where the already burdened American health infrastructure is preparing for an influx of millions of new elderly patients. The Affordable Care Act included new attempts to …

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Diabetes Diagnosed Using New Microchip Technology

Diabetes is quickly becoming more prevalent in many parts of the world, even among the young. Part of the problem can be traced to the expanding waistlines of people in western countries, but preventative health programs to battle obesity are still just beginning to make a dent in the rising numbers. With doctors having to deal with the rise in …

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Diabetes, Obesity Linked by Missing Protein

It’s been clear now for decades that obesity is somehow linked to the development of diabetes. As Americans have grown to staggering proportions, diabetes diagnoses have risen accordingly, even among teens. Exactly why this is the case isn’t fully understood, but researchers are now closing in on some answers. A new study published in the journal Cell Reports suggests that …

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Depression Signs Could be Treated With Alzheimer’s Drug

Millions of Americans with depression function perfectly well using common treatments, but there are those whose disease shows resistance to most drugs. Researchers this week announced some hope for those people in new research that could eventually lead to a treatment for treatment-resistant depression – and that hope is coming from an unlikely place. Researchers at the University of Texas …

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Lung Cancer Treatment Resistance Reversed in New Study

Lung cancer patients got some good news this week as a new study has shown how doctors might reverse genetic resistance to a common lung cancer drug. According to the study’s authors, around 40% of lung cancer patients are resistant to a specific targeted therapy drug known as erlotinib. The drug is an EGFR inhibitor and the therapy is meant …

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Atrial Fibrillation Costs Rising in the U.S.

The U.S. is now suffering from what the medical community is referring to as an obesity epidemic and doctors across the country are seeing the negative health effects of rising weight. A new study this month has shown yet another metric by which Americans’ heart health could be getting even worse. The study, published in the American Heart Association journal …

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Weight Loss At Any Age Improves Heart Health, Shows Study

It’s well-known that being overweight, and especially being obese, can bring on severe health complications. This is particularly true for heart health, as obesity has been directly associated with worse cardiovascular outcomes, regardless of how healthy a person may otherwise be. Despite these risks, more Americans and Britons than ever are now obese. Though the young and middle-aged often turn …

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Outgoing People Are Happier, Shows Study

It is easy to see that extroverts are generally happy when interacting with others. Now a new study shows that extroverts actually are happier and that this is the case all across the world. The study, published in the Journal of Research in Personality, corroborates previous studies showing that even introverts have more positive feelings and greater levels of happiness …

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Facebook Linked to Negative Female Body Image

The new world of social media now allows nearly everyone across the world to connect. The benefits of this technology are plain, and platforms such as Facebook and Twitter are now demonstrating how worldwide networks of people can bring positive change. These networks, however, are made up of real human beings. This fact means that all of the problems, insecurities, …

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Fussy: TV Study Finds Difficult Infants Watch More Media

It has been known for decades now that too much TV can be a bad thing, especially for children. Recent research has even linked excessive TV viewing habits to obesity and elevated cholesterol in kids. Now it appears that too much TV can be an issue for even the youngest of children. A new study published today in the journal …

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Spinal Cord Stimulation Brings Movement to Paraplegics

For many paraplegics the road to recovery too often does not end with regained movement. Many paralyzed muscles remain that way despite decades of medical research. Now a new technique is showing promising results and has given several paraplegics voluntary movements once again. A new study published today in the journal Brain has shown that a new technique of stimulating …

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Procrastination Genetically Linked to Impulsivity

Even with the constant connection that humans now have with each other through the internet, procrastination can still be a problem. Now new research is showing that procrastination may share an evolutionary like to another common human trait – impulsivity. The study, published in the journal Psychological Science, shows that these two traits are genetically linked. The study’s authors suggest …

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Violent-Game Criticism is Dying Out

Every time a new entertainment medium arises, a select segment of the human population will rail against it for content deemed inappropriate. By reflecting the true nature of humanity new platforms invoke the ire of those who feel obliged to protect others from what they view as a new affront to their morality. Throughout the last decade video games were …

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Less Screen Time Could Leave Children Healthier

It’s been known for decades now that couch potatoes tend to be less healthy than their more active peers. With content moving onto mobile devices, however, it is unclear whether the same link will be maintained for kids and adults who consumer media on-the-go. A new study published this week in JAMA Pediatrics suggests that no matter what entertainment is …

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E-Cigarettes May Face Some Bad News

A new study in the Journal of the American Medical Association: Internal Medicine may be bad news for e-cigarette manufacturers and marketers. One of the big selling points for e-digs has been that they are supposed to help you quit smoking. But, according to the new study, they do nothing of the sort. The report states: “A longitudinal, international study …

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Schools Are Bad At Stopping Bullying, Shows Study

Bullying has been on the mind of parents for the past few years. With the recent rise in cyber-bullying bringing the phenomenon home from school, many are worried that bullied children could have no escape. These fears could be stoked by the recent discovery that even popular children are bullied by their peers. Schools struggling with bullying problems have implemented …

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Aspirin Doesn’t Prevent Pregnancy Loss, Shows Study

It is common in the U.S. for doctors to prescribe low doses of aspirin for prospective mothers who have had a previous pregnancy loss. This is despite the fact that aspirin therapy has not been proven to increase the likelihood of viable pregnancies. The idea is that increased blood flow to the uterus might help pregnancies that would otherwise be …

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Childhood Obesity Could Hurt Brainpower, Shows Study

Even with childhood obesity rates seen falling in recent years in the U.S., the medical profession is still considering the phenomenon an epidemic. With the physical health concerns associated with childhood obesity well-documented, researchers are now discovering the mental concerns the condition can bring. A new study published in the journal Cerebral Cortex is showing that childhood obesity could be …

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Even Popular Kids Are Bullied, Shows Study

As parents become more aware of the internet, more attention has been brought to the topic of cyber-bullying and bullying in general. What was once seen as a right of passage for children is now condemned as a practice that can take a brutal psychological and physical toll on those bullied. The stereotype of bullying generally portrays larger or more …

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Migraine Headaches Linked to Post-Stress Relaxation

For millions of Americans migraine headaches can appear suddenly and often lead to debilitating pain. Because migraines are still not well-understood by the medical community, treatments for the condition currently involve medications or odd-looking headbands and magnetic head devices. New research, though, is now linking migraines to some unlikely factors and could lead to breakthroughs in treatment. A new study …

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Gaming Isn’t Entirely Antisocial, Shows Study

For decades now parents across the world have been nagging children to put down the video games and get outside the house to socialize. With the advent of the internet and more social gaming, however, new research is showing that video games may be an integral part of the social lives of today’s youth. A new study published in the …

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Diabetes Risk Lowered With Mediterranean Diet

Millions of people worldwide are diagnosed with diabetes everyday. While many cases can be managed with insulin and a strict diet, some people still suffer. A new study, scheduled to be presented at the American College of Cardiology’s 63rd Annual Scientific Sessions today, reveals a new diet, called the Mediterranean Diet, that may help the people who are already diagnosed, …

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Flu Vaccines Cut Risks For Children, Shows Study

The backlash in the U.S. against vaccines seen over the past decade seems to be dying down. Incidents such as the recent Mumps outbreak at Ohio State University have demonstrated just how dangerous anti-vaccination views are, though anti-vaccine fear mongering is still prevalent in the popular culture. Despite criticism, the science behind vaccines is still marching forward. This week a …

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