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Google Unveils SketchUp Blog

Google SketchUp enthusiasts, rejoice!  An official blog for SketchUp is now up and running, and if the posts on it are any indication, this will not be one of Google’s sites that sit stagnant for a month (or more) at a time.

Ask to Put You in Control of Privacy with AskEraser
Ask.com is taking online privacy to a new level–by putting you in control of your privacy when searching on the internet.

Ask.com

Fear The Bots For Quality Score

Since Google added a new layer of complexity to the AdWords system this year in the form of Quality Score, not a lot has been published about how it works or why it does a certain thing.

Flickr Criticized For Regional Censorship

Yahoo’s Flickr is the latest target of criticism after restricting access to erotic art photos in Hong Kong. Though Internet companies self-censoring in certain countries is not a new dilemma, this incident coincides with a blogger that faces fines for just linking to offending material.

AOL Settles With States On Cancellation Policy

AOL has reached a settlement with 48 states and the District of Columbia over their confusing cancellation policy.

Google To Ban Ephedra Ads

Google’s crackin’ down – some AdWords users have received an email stating that the company will soon forbid any advertisements related to the drug ephedra.

Google Undecided On Joining Wireless Auction

With a nationwide transition to digital television slowly taking place, Google may be interested in participating in the federal auction of the 700MHz wireless bands.

Google Public Policy Blog Touches On Carhenge

Google’s Public Policy Blog has been home to discussions about censorship, net neutrality, and national security.  Now it’s promoting Carhenge, Nebraska’s “whimsical recreation” of England’s famous stone ruins.  Ah, well.  “All work and no play . . .”

Google: Censorship Is A Trade Barrier

There’s something about this topic that is unsettling – the deal seems nearly devilish, beneficial and somewhat horrifying at the same time. Google’s latest plea to the US and EU governments to help fight censorship centers on the economics, not the political morality, of censorship.

Google Publicizes Public Policy Blog

After starting out on an internal-only basis, the Google Public Policy blog has been opened for public consumption and commentary.

Google Unveils Public Policy Blog

With the new Google Public Policy Blog, transparency’s the name of the game; Googlers will explain the company’s position on issues that could affect us all.

Google Reduces Data Retention Policy To 18 Months

Google’s Global Privacy Counsel Peter Fleischer appears to be a master of textual undercurrents (what the reader understands as "between the lines"), responding to Privacy International’s recent condemnation of the company’s privacy policies without mentioning the group itself.

Changes Afoot With AdSense Policies

People returning to their feedreaders after the SMX conference and elsewhere found new AdSense policy changes awaiting them.

EU Investigates Google’s Privacy Rules

Google’s policy of retaining user information for up to two years, has become the center of an investigation by an EU panel, according to the AP.

Google Ad Policy Cracks Down On Plagiarism

Advertisements for weapons, drugs, and prostitutes have been banned from Google.  All right, fair enough.  But now advertisements for essay-writing services will also be forbidden, and while more than a few people have raised their eyebrows, others have cheered.

US Broadband Penetration Just Stinks
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The United States has 58.1 million broadband (256 kbps or better) in December 2006, but at 19.6 subscribers per 100 inhabitants, America is just average at getting broadband to the people.

US Broadband Penetration Just Stinks
US Broadband Penetration Just Stinks
US Broadband Penetration Just Stinks
Google Pulls Imus Related Keywords?
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It hasn’t been a good week for long-time shock jock Don Imus. After his controversial comments about the Rutgers women’s basketball team, his Imus in the Morning radio show was quickly dumped by both MSNBC and CBS. The events surrounding the scandal have had an interesting impact on the search world as well.

Prior to CBS axing the Imus program, several major sponsors pulled their advertising from the show, which no doubt was a major factor in the network’s decision to pull it from the airwaves.

O’Reilly Draws Up Blogging Code Policy

In the wake of the Kathy Sierra kerfuffle, there have been calls for a blogging code of ethics; the problem isn’t with bloggers, or even their blogs.

Google and Ethics
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I have been consulting on internet marketing for over a decade. In my career I have seen many unethical things, from Fortune 500 companies performing many questionable actions, to observing sales agents selling on a fundamentally wrong foundation.

Love Ajax? Hate The Exploits

Bringing certain content-updating behaviors to web pages without reloading them has been a key piece of the ‘Web 2.0′ online application meme; it now appears the criminals could have a way to break them open too.

Opera Announces Official April Fool’s Policy
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The Oslo-based software company clarified its position on tomfoolery, gimcrackery, shenanigans, mischief, mayhem, but not hijinks.

Opera Software ASA, makers of the best browser in this, or indeed any, universe, today revealed the results of a five month process to determine this year’s April Fool’s joke. After considerable competitive analysis, structural synthesis, skilled observation, educated prognostication and blind luck, the management along with Opera’s Corporate Relations and Prevarication department determined there will be no April Fool’s joke for FY07.

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