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Net Neutrality Articles

Law School Symposium on Net Neutrality
A friend of mine at the San Francisco Law school just let me know about a symposium the law school is holding on Net Neutrality.

Net Neutrality Groups Press FCC

Free Press, the organization behind SaveTheInternet.com, responded to the Federal Communications Commission’s expressed intent to investigate Comcast and Verizon Wireless over alleged content blocking. The group urged the FCC to respond quickly in order to protect the free flow of information on all networks.

Clinton’s Broadband Proposals Losing Support
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Those (derogatorily or not) considered on the left side of the political spectrum seem to be turning on Democratic frontrunner Hillary Clinton, especially in regard to her plan for expanding broadband access.

FCC Looking into Comcast

Back in November, we mentioned how Free Press and other groups wanted ISP/cable company Comcast brought before the FCC for the way the company imitated users on BitTorrent to terminate downloads. And now, the FCC will be looking into it—at least according to Chairman Kevin Martin, speaking at CES.

French, Canadians, (Mark) Cuban Go After P2P

Torrents and peer-to-peer networks have had a rough couple of weeks lately. In addition to Cox and Comcast’s recent blocking of torrent sites, file-sharing has been under assault in France and Canada, not to mention from billionaire Mark Cuban.

First Comcast, Now Cox Busted ‘Managing’ Traffic

Comcast’s BitTorrent snafu set off another investigation of a cable provider and yielded similar results. This time it’s Cox’s interference with file-sharing service eDonkey setting Net Neutrality alarms.

The Writers Strike And The Future Of The Net

The Writers Guild of America strike has been an interesting debacle to watch, complete with a host of issues the public might not have thought of before. The inevitable convergence of the Internet and TV is one of them; the continued homogenization of American culture is another.

Is Hillary Abandoning Net Neutrality?

Unfortunately, Net Neutrality won’t be a make-or-break campaign issue, even if it should be. For most voters, it’s a fairly heady concept, perhaps so difficult supporters worry frontrunner Hillary Clinton is backing away from it altogether.

Obama To Unveil Plans At The Googleplex

Democratic Presidential hopeful Senator Barack Obama will be speaking at the Googleplex tonight to outline his plan to ensure not only an open Internet, but also an open government that utilizes technology to solve pressing national issues.

FCC Gets Monkey’s Paw From Telco Front Group

You might say it’s a sort of monkey’s paw that Hands Off the Internet, an AT&T-backed "grass roots" organization has called on the FCC to investigate Comcast for violating the four principles of Network Neutrality. On the surface, it looks like progress. But can it be trusted?

House Committee Approves Broadband Census Act

Back to back bills in the Congress offer a glimmer of hope to those concerned about the state of broadband penetration in America; back to back moves show a Congress willing to step up where the Federal Communications Commission has failed.

Obama Pledges Net Neutrality Support
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During a live dialogue with MTV viewers, Presidential candidate Barack Obama pledged to support Net Neutrality if elected president, and to appoint a pro-neutrality Federal Communications Commission.

Did Barack Dodge the Net Neutrality Question?

Senator and Presidential candidate Barack Obama (D-IL) was expected to field a question about Network Neutrality today during a live video stream via MTV and MySpace from Coe College, in Cedar Rapids, Iowa. Doing so, according to supporters would bring the issue to the campaign table officially. If they were waiting for it, they were disappointed.

Senators Call For Net Neutrality Hearing
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Senators Bryon Dorgan (D-ND) and Olympia Snowe (R-Maine) sent a letter today to Sen. Daniel Inouye, chairman of the Senate Commerce Committee, calling for a hearing to discuss phone and cable companies’ recent discrimination against content on their networks, and whether current regulatory protections are enough.

Comcast Impersonates China and Gnutella, Too

Some of the uproar last week was regarding Comcast’s blocking of BitTorrent traffic, a move that, by itself raised concerns about the power over content and packets the cable company was usurping. Over the weekend it came to light that Comcast not only blocked BitTorrent, but also Gnutella and Lotus Notes.

Net Neutrality, Now With Less Spin

Have the telecoms and cable companies just abandoned the Net Neutrality fight altogether? It used to be they staged aggressive rhetoric battles, created questionable studies, and pretended to honor Net Neutrality on their own – without legislation.

A Neutral Net Will Save The Watchdogs

Something is starkly wrong when diametrically opposed ideologues join hands in public to protest something else. That something wrong, in a nutshell: the government and communications companies working in concert to erode the freedoms that made our country great.

(Woops) Telecoms Help Make Case For Neutral Net
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One of the more parroted talking points against Net Neutrality has been verbalized this way: It’s a solution in search of a problem. Rather snide, really, if you think about it, and is a remark that usually accompanies a brush off to concerns of gatekeeper abuses.

A Car In Every Garage, Fast Internet On Every PC

It’s a slow, but moving boulder. Senator John Kerry (D-Mass.) called on the Bush administration to make a commitment to making high-speed Internet access more widely available to small businesses and all Americans.

Porn Picks Bone With Torrents
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It’s hard to have sympathy for a dirty, exploitative medium when the producers of it cry foul over piracy – after all dirty is as dirty does, and karma can be your friend or your enemy. But at the same time, copyrights are copyrights and are intended to protect the truly artful from thieves as much as they protect the scummy.

Facebook Islam Row Highlights Free Speech Issues
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Historically, in the brick-and-mortar world, we’ve had courts to settle disputes. Online, there are terms of service agreements and invisible judges determining, usually at the behest of the loudest and largest mob, who is guilty of crossing the line between conscious protest and hate speech.

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