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ISPs Articles

Controversial Goodmail Raises Another $20 Million
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GoodmailGoodmail is a company that offers a service called CertifiedEmail whose goal is to eliminate security risks in email, and it is one that many organizations turn to when they have important emails to send. Goodmail’s customers include a number of big name retailers from Walmart to Old Navy, not to mention ISPs like AOL, AT&T and Comcast, and government agencies like the FBI and the FDA.

AOL Still Reaching Record Numbers

AOLYou would think that the growth of broadband usage would take away from AOL’s business. That and the fact that they’ve been closing down services like mad.  Despite these things, AOL has managed to hit an all time high when it comes to traffic numbers, and has experienced year-over-year growth for unique visitors for the 21st month in a row.

The following AOL sites reached all-time high page view numbers in October:

Number Of Illegal Downloads Falling In The UK
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Fewer people in the UK are illegally downloading music for fear of having their Internet connections cut off, according to a new survey from Entertainment Media Research.

Three quarters of music pirates would stop if told by their Internet Service Provider (ISP) the survey of 1,500 UK consumers revealed.

About 39 percent of music fans currently download songs from illegal sites, compared to 43 percent in 2007.

Proposals announced in July said that music pirates could have their Internet access restricted if a voluntary enforcement on piracy is not effective.

British Telecom’s Doing ISP-Based Behavioral Targeting
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British Telecom began some ISP-based behavioral ad targeting testing today. Before privacy enthusiasts freak out, it’s on an opt-in basis…so far.

"Around 10,000 customers will be invited to opt in to the trial when they commence their browsing session. We will issue invitations at random," said British Telecom.

U.S. Getting Dominated in Internet Traffic

Last week, U.S. cable provider and ISP Comcast put a cap on monthly broadband use, and now there are reports surfacing that the U.S. in general is falling behind when it comes to Internet traffic. This is not a direct result of the Comcast situation, but with Comcast being the 2nd largest ISP in the country, it’s certainly not going to help.

FCC Interested in Lowering Your Cable Prices
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Things have been looking up for Hulu and online video in general for a variety of reasons. News has come out today emphasizing this fact even more. ABC News is reporting that the FCC thinks that cable television providers are charging too much for access. I couldn’t agree more.

The American In-Flight Internet Revolution?

In-flight broadband Internet access in reaching full swing for American Airlines.

The airline has announced that it is "marking the beginning of the next wireless revolution."  A bit overstated perhaps. They’re offering in-flight Internet access at $12.95 a flight.

EFF Launches Net Neutrality Tool

The Electronic Frontier Foundation has introduced a new tool that allows users to find out if their ISPs are throttling their P2P files.

The new "Switzerland Tool" will reveal if a user’s network connection has any restrictions on it from ISPs.

Charter Postpones Ad Targeting Plan

It looks like privacy concerns have put Charter Communications ad targeting plans on hold.

As we reported last month, ISPs are sitting on a wealth of personalized data, but lawmakers have expressed concerns over the methods used to tap into that data–especially "deep packet inspection."

UK Tells ISPs To Get Tough On Piracy
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Internet service providers in the UK must take tougher measures to prevent illegal downloading or face legal sanctions the government has warned.

Andy Burnham, the culture secretary, told Internet service providers he would introduce legislation in April of next year if they did not voluntarily take action to reduce online piracy.

UK Internet Users Could Be Banned For Illegal Downloads

Internet users in the UK who go online and illegally download music and movies could have their Internet access revoked according to plans the government is considering.

A draft proposal says that Internet service providers would have to monitor users who accessed pirated content through their accounts. The government says that plans are in an early stage and it is working on final regulations.

Six million users a year are estimated to download files illegally in the UK and music and film companies say it is costing them millions in lost revenue annually.

Is Internet Use in Your Home Public?

In the United States, we have some pretty easy-to-remember guidelines on what constitutes “public” and “private.”

Areas like your home and your car are considered private. With a few notable exceptions, other areas are public. These legal definitions apply to entities like the police and the press—anything that happens (or is found) in public is “fair game,” but to intrude on your privacy, the police have to have at least a reasonable suspicion of illegal activity (or your permission).

FCC Looking into Comcast

Back in November, we mentioned how Free Press and other groups wanted ISP/cable company Comcast brought before the FCC for the way the company imitated users on BitTorrent to terminate downloads. And now, the FCC will be looking into it—at least according to Chairman Kevin Martin, speaking at CES.

FCC: ISPs Should Forward Emails Like Post Office

The Federal Communications Commission is looking into the issue of whether or not Internet service providers should be required to forward emails to customers who switch providers.

FCC: Public Debate Keeps ISPs At Bay

Federal Communications Commissioner Michael Copps cited AT&T’s recent censorship of a Pearl Jam concert as evidence for the necessity of Network Neutrality to preserve democracy and freedom of speech.

‘Catch-up’ Packet Takes Shape, ISPs Fire Shots

British Internet service providers are concerned with the BBC’s plans to allow viewers to freely download recent broadcasts and view them within 30 days, arguing that "catch-up" TV will eat up bandwidth if enough viewers take advantage of it.

ISPs Threaten to Stall Online Video Apps

Steve O’Hear — who also writes for ZDNet on social media — has a great post up at Last100 about how bandwidth-stingy Internet Service Providers threaten to stall many online-video apps such as Joost by throttling the download speeds that their users get.

ISPs Still Ducking Clickstream Questions

The issue of data privacy has long been one of intense debate and speculation across the blogosphere. Reports have surfaced here and there of ISPs selling clickstream data to third party advertisers for mere cents per user. As journalists continue seeking answers, the ISPs are remaining conspicuously tight-lipped about their data practices.

RIAA Continues Pressuring ISPs For Information

The Recording Industry Association of America (RIAA) has been relentlessly fierce in its pursuit of individuals it deems as “criminals” by filing numerous lawsuits over the past several years.

It looks like the RIAA is trying to do all it can to encourage ISPs to be more forthcoming with identifying information in order to fuel their tactics which amount to little more than a legal means of extorting money from everyday citizens.

The Law, Microsoft, And ISPs

A couple of legally-tinged topics consider whether Microsoft’s pledge not to assert patents against developers as part of its Novell deal actually do what they say, while a British lawyer contends Internet service providers should be liable when a denial of service (DoS) attack takes a website offline.

Why Web Hosts and ISPs Need Web Site Monitoring

If you have spent much time earning a living on the Internet, few things will surprise you. However, I am always amazed with how many companies and individuals make astounding claims without backing them up.