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Copyright Articles

MySpace Launches Tool To Fight Infringement

MySpace has launched a new copyright protection tool in an effort to combat infringing video content. The tool called "Take Down Stay Down" prevents users from re-posting videos that have been previously removed at the request of copyright owners.

EFF Makes Viacom Cry Uncle On Fair Use
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We’ve said it before: It’s not a good idea to eff with the EFF (Electronic Frontier Foundation). Now that Viacom has admitted it effed up by ordering the take down of a parody on YouTube, the EFF and Stanford Law’s Fair Use Project (FUP, or as they collectively should be known, EFF-FUP) have dismissed their lawsuit.

Yes, that was a long way to go for an effing pun.

Blinkx Remote Serves Up TV Shows

The landscape of online video becomes more interesting by the day. While YouTube find itself bogged down in a quagmire of takedown requests and DMCA notices, Blinkx has decided to roll out a new search tool specifically aimed at directing users to television content that they can view and/or download.

Death Knell Chimes For Internet Radio
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In March, the U.S. Copyright Royalty Board approved a proposal by SoundExchange, working on behalf of the RIAA, which would implement a significant increase in royalty rates for streaming audio providers. Realizing that these rates would put them under, online radio stations banded together in one last desperate appeal to the CRB to reconsider the decision.

Unfortunately for Internet radio providers, and for music lovers around the world, the judges at the CRB denied the appeal headed up by NPR and joined by several online radio stations.

Is Linking To Pirated Content A Liability?
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The online video copyright issue is set to get more intense as legal lines come closer into focus. The YouTube and Viacom case, in the unlikely event it sees a courtroom, would be large enough to solidify some ground rules. There are also international complications, which makes one wonder if the World Wide Web will one day necessitate a Virtual World Court.  

YouTube’s Copyright Problems Overblown
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Vidmeter has released a study, which examines the issue of copyrighted videos on YouTube. According to the study "Analysis of Copyrighted Videos on YouTube.com", Viacom content had the most views accounting for 2.37 percent of all YouTube views.

EFF Sues Viacom to Prevent DMCA Abuse
You already know that Viacom is suing YouTube for a gazillion dollars for copyright infringement, but now the cable company is facing a backlash over its careless use of the DMCA.

Nate Anderson reports the Electronic Frontier Foundation – a nonprofit group that looks to protect digital rights and free speech – is suing Viacom for its misuse of the Digital Millennium Copyright Act (DMCA).

Among thousands of DMCA takedown notices sent out, is one of a Stephen Colbert parody video that the EFF claims doesn’t violate any copyright laws.

RIAA: eCommerce Public Enemy #1
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With the future of industries such as online radio and peer-to-peer networking hanging in the balance, the pendulum of power is shifting from the hands of the suits at the RIAA into the hands of the public. Those who feel they have been wronged by the organization are collectively beginning to fight back.

RIAA Caught Between Rock and a Hard Place

The Recording Industry Association of America (RIAA) has been involved in a notorious legal dispute with Patti Santangelo for the past two years. In a decision handed down from the presiding judge in the case today, the RIAA was dealt a severe blow that could have far-reaching implications.

Copyright Board to Hold Rehearing on Net Radio Ruling

Chief US Copyright Royalty Judge James Scott Sledge announced Tuesday that his board would hold a rehearing on the controversial decision (pdf of ruling) to raise royalty rates for internet streaming to unprecedented levels and gave broadcasters and organizations who requested the rehearing until April 2nd to submit documents detailing their positions.

Adaptation – Does it Trump Copyright?

A recent post by Dorrian Porter highlighted an interesting topic raised by Russell Buckley just over one year ago. The title was, ‘Who Gave Google Permission to be the Judge and Jury of Mobile Content?‘ Despite some very informed comments the topic remained unresolved. In order to render certain web pages suitable for mobile devices, Google had cut out some advertising and in some cases added their own.

Webmaster Claims Spider Entered Contract In Suit
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The Web and artificial intelligence have brought about some surreal, science fiction like questions. The most recent mind-bending concept is whether or not robots can enter into contracts – that is, is a Web crawler implicitly entering a contract posted on a website announcing copyright conditions?

Deleted YouTube Videos Still Available
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When it receives a complaint from content owners regarding copyrighted videos, YouTube is usually pretty quick to comply with regulations and pull down the infringing clips. As it turns out, those clips may still be available for viewing and/or download on YouTube’s servers.

The news doesn’t seem to be getting any better for YouTube.

An Internet Crook Is ‘Sorry’

Michael Crook, along with the rest of us, learned some valuable lessons. The biggest lesson we all learned (Crook much, much more acutely), is that you don’t screw with the Electronic Frontier Foundation (EFF). The EFF eff’d him up good.

Viacom Sues Google, YouTube
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Since negotiations fell apart between YouTube and Viacom, analysts have been speculating about whether or not the media conglomerate would take legal action against the popular video-sharing site. Specifically in light of the fact that Viacom video clips continue to appear in YouTube’s library on a regular basis.

Microsoft and Google – Different Approaches to Copyright

The Association of American Publishers and the Authors Guild is none too happy with Google’s plan to indiscriminately scan, index, and allow the searching of millions of books from libraries the world over and Microsoft is capitalizing on this rare chink in Google’s armor.

Copyrighters are claiming infringement because Google is making advertising revenue from the results of book searches in the Google Book Search system. Here are all of Google’s arguments that I found:

A Podcaster Opportunity

Internet radio broadcasters face the alarming prospect of paying much higher royalties to song performers, says the Wall Street Journal, a burden that could silence some online stations.

Major Record Labels Go After Yahoo China

A consortium of record labels which include Warner Music Group and Universal Music Group have filed suit against Alibaba, which is an operator affiliated with Yahoo China, alleging copyright infringement by the site. The announcement comes as record labels, along with the RIAA, are cracking down harder than ever on digital music piracy.

It’s been an up and down week for digital music aficionados, and it’s only Tuesday.

Microsoft: Google Can’t ‘Opt Out’ Of Copyright Law

You could say some of the sound bites from Microsoft’s latest rant over Google’s approach to copyright law bear a resemblance to a political campaign – not just because they carry the same tintinnabulation of highroad mantras, but have the same stabbing indignation of a call to war. Google’s doin’ wrong, says the Beast of Redmond, and we’ve got to do something about it.

MSN: Google Violates Copyright Systematically

Microsoft has attacked Google Inc.’s rival book scanning project. Microsoft said that Google “systematically violates copyright”. Thomas C. Rubin, an associate general counsel at Microsoft has written how Google is violating copyrights in a speech which he planned to give at the annual meeting of the Association of American Publishers in NY.

Thomas writes, "Companies that create no content of their own, and make money solely on the backs of other people’s content, are raking in billions through advertising revenue."

RIAA Targets Internet Radio
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In a decision that could drive the nail in the coffin to Internet radio providers, the U.S. Copyright Royalty Board has endorsed a proposal by SoundExchange to enact royalty rates for webcasts and streaming music sites that will stay in effect from 2006 until 2010.

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