All Posts Tagged Tag: ‘archaeology’

Queen Nefertiti Finally Found?

Queen Nefertiti is one of the most famous and mysterious characters in the study of ancient Egypt. The story of Queen Nefertiti has captured the imaginations of generations of historians, archaeologists and simple history lovers alike for thousands of years. Queen Nefertiti disappeared over 3,000 years ago, after ruling Egypt alongside her husband Amenhotep IV, in a fog of mystery. …

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Iron Age Coins Unearthed in Britain

Over two dozen of rare Roman and Iron Age coins were discovered inside of a cave in Dovedale, Derbyshire, United Kingdom. Four of the coins were initially discovered by a random cave dweller in the Peak district, which lead to a full-scale excavation by archaeologists. In what has been described as an extremely rare occurrence, 26 coins from two civilizations, …

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3,600-Year-Old Mummy Unearthed In Luxor Egypt

A routine dig in Luxor, Egypt has resulted in the discovery of a sarcophagus – with a mummy inside and intact. The team of Egyptian and Spanish archeologists that led the excavation were working on a tomb when they unearthed an elaborately painted and well preserved sarcophagus carved with a human face. It is believed to be 3,600 years old. …

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Cat Domestication Traced to China, Shows Study

Though it had long been assumed that cats were domesticated by the Egyptians, researchers have now discovered that the animals were first tamed into pets at least one thousand years earlier. A new study, published in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, traces cat domestication to the Chinese villiage of Quanhucun some 5,300 years ago. Researchers believe …

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Tunnels Under Rome Being Mapped to Prevent Further Damage to City

An extensive series of ancient tunnels and quarries under Rome are threatening parts of the city that has been built atop them. Many years ago, Rome’s earliest architects discovered that tuff, or rock made of consolidated volcanic ash, was a perfect building material. It was strong, yet easily carved into blocks. The soil beneath Rome was layered atop this tuff, …

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Conehead Skull Found in Multicultural Necropolis

The site of Obernai in France was occupied by one people or another for the last 6000 years. Now, a series of graves found there date from 4000 years ago to 2000 years ago. These 38 tombs span a fantastic portion of human history: from the Stone Age to the Dark Age. LiveScience reports that the tombs were first discovered …

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The Earliest Life Form Found So Far is in Australia

The Guardian is reporting that Earth’s earliest life form has been found in Australia. An Aussie research team accompanied by some U.S. scientists discovered a series of “complex microbial ecosystems” they date to 3.5 billion years ago. The find was made in Australia’s western Pilbara region in rock sediments considered to be some of the oldest found. In a rock …

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Global Warming Causes Shrinking Mammals, Enlarged Reptiles

Phys.org noted a study published earlier this week by a University of Michigan paleontologist and his research team. They claim to have discovered a process of mammalian “dwarfing” that occurred during multiple climate warming events between 50 and 53 million years ago, and they say that it will probably happen again. Paleontologists were relatively aware of the 55-million-year-old Paleocene-Eocene Thermal …

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Archaeologist: King Tut Died… While Chariot Racing

His discovery captivated the world, and from 1922 on, discoverers Lord Carnarvon and Howard Carter would become the most famous (and, allegedly, accursed) Egyptologists until their mysterious deaths. Over 20 people associated with the famous discovery of King Tutankhamen’s earthly remains died in mysterious ways, often attributed to “the curse of Tutankhamen” and the supernatural power of the ancient Egyptian …

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Five Cannons Recovered From Blackbeard’s Ship

In 1718, the legendary pirate Edward Teach, AKA Blackbeard, sank the Queen Anne’s Revenge off the coast of Beaufort, NC after the flagship accidentally ran aground in the shallows. For nearly 300 years, the ship rested and rusted, until 1996 saw the beginnings of an archaeological excavation to recover the vessel and its contents. In 1997 when the team began …

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Study: Pollen Tells Us What Killed Bronze Age Civilizations

The New York Times reported that a recent study of pollen may explain the sudden collapse of what were, at the time, highly successful civilizations like the Egyptians, the Babylonians, and the Hittites. 3200 years in the distant past, Tel Aviv was a major trading center in Israel, Ramses II ruled over a vast Egyptian empire, and many other cultures …

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Study Confirms Humans Came From Africa Using… Herpes

Scientists have debated, since such discussions were made permissible, the origins of the human species: did we come from Asia? Africa? Maybe even the Middle East? Until very recently, many of these theories had equal merit. However, a study of the complete genetic code of the herpes simplex virus type one (HSV-1), notorious for its oral cold sores, has confirmed …

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Skeletons Found in Georgia Shine Light on Evolution

NPR reports that for the first time, the former Soviet state of Georgia unveiled an archaeological display of skulls and skeletons of five ancient humans they unearthed in 2005 in Dmanisi. One skull, being simply named “Skull 5,” is being hailed as one of the most complete proto-human skulls ever recovered. The findings will be published in the journal Science. …

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Fossilized Mosquito Found; Sadly Lacks Dino Blood

Smithsonian Magazine just put out a blog that chronicles the strange journey of a fossilized mosquito with ancient blood still contained in its stomach, reminiscent of Steven Spielberg’s blockbuster Jurassic Park. The ancient mosquito was unearthed in Montana’s Glacier National Park by a geology graduate student named Kurt Constenius, who picked it up during a fossil-hunting trip with his parents …

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Study: First Cave Painters Were Mostly Female

Like many disciplines, archaeology suffers from an overtly masculine bias in the literature; however, a recent study of ancient cave art could overturn at least some of that bias. National Geographic reported this week that Pennsylvania State University archaeologist Dean Snow traveled to eight sites famous for cave paintings in France and Spain. After analyzing the hand stencils and comparing …

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Archaeologists Uncover Skeletal Victims of Ancient Raid

NBC News reports that Swedish archaeologists have discovered a terrifying scene that is being called the “Swedish Pompeii.” An island off the Swedish coast named Öland held the remains of a 5th century fort, and after discovering the foundations of a house, the scientists discovered a horrific scene. Five people, all unearthed from the same ruined house, had been suddenly …

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British Archaeologists Uncover Mesolithic Tools, Roman Skulls

National Geographic reported on Friday that tunnelers who were contracted with expanding the London Underground have discovered over 20 Roman-era skulls, probably dated to the first century C.E. The beheaded Romans have been suggested to be possible victims of the famed Warrior Queen Boudicca, who led her Iceni tribe in a rebellion against Roman rule. Speaking with National Geographic about …

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Archaeologists Unearth Ancient Leopard Trap

LiveScience wrote earlier this week that archaeologists have discovered a 5000-year-old-leopard trap in the Negev Desert, a region in Israel. The study is to be published in the British archaeology journal Antiquity. Initially believed to be made earlier due to the trap’s proximity to more recent sites, the technology used is almost identical to the kind of traps used by …

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Vikings Beheaded Their Slaves Before Burial

In a study published last week in the Journal of Archaeological Science, a team of researchers from the University of Oslo in Norway have discovered that the Vikings distinguished among social classes, much like every other ancient society (Mayans, Aztecs, Egyptians, Mesopotamians) and that slaves who were buried with their masters were beheaded and offered as “grave gifts.” Discovered in …

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2,000+ Year-Old ‘Biblical’ Town Discovered

Archaeologist Dr. Ken Dark of the University of Reading (Berkshire, England) and a team currently in the midst of a field survey study, have claimed to have potentially discovered the location of an ancient city known as Dalmanutha in modern day Israel. Dark and his team have managed to unearth artifacts leading to this assertion in a location slightly north …

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Mayan Mass Grave Uncovered at Uxul

LiveScience reported last week that an excavation of an ancient Mayan city has yielded a 1400-year-old mass grave with 24 skeletons inside. Nicolaus Seefield, the dig’s coordinator and archaeologist at the University of Bonn in Germany, found the site after he was working on two massive reservoirs meant to store Mayan drinking water, also recently discovered. Seefield wrote an email …

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Archaeologists Uncover Byzantine Gold at Jerusalem Temple Mount

An archaeological dig conducted by Hebrew University researchers has uncovered a startling find: a treasure trove of Byzantine gold and silver that included an impressive gold medallion emblazoned with a menorah. The Times of Israel covered the story. Other items uncovered also featured Jewish symbols and icons, and the find is dated to the brief period of history when Jerusalem …

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1700 Year Old Peruvian Priestess: Did Women Rule Peru?

In the last few years, archaeological finds coming out of Peru are shedding new light on a South American contemporary civilization that existed simultaneously as the Mayans. The most recent discovery, reported on by the AFP, is of another pre-Hispanic priestess of possible royal descent, making this the eighth such discovery in over 20 years. The skeleton was found at …

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Creation Museum Employee Struck by Lightning

In what appears to be a hilariously ironic turn of events, someone who works at the Petersburg Creation Museum was struck by lightning while maintaining one of the zip line courses. The worker was not directly struck, but he was holding a zip line while standing on the ground at the time the lightning impacted. A Kentucky local news affiliate …

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15,000 Year Old Petroglyphs Discovered in Reno

A discovery made northeast of Reno, NV just might shake the foundations of North American anthropology: petroglyphs located there have been dated to around 15,000 years ago. NPR covered the story. Paleoclimatologist and scientist emeritus with the U.S. Geological survey, Larry Benson, relied upon his expert knowledge of the Nevada climate to conduct the more precise dating. “I think it’s …

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Irish Bog Body Older than King Tut Discovered

Recently, a worker that was milling peat for the Bord na Móna utility company discovered an ancient mummy in an Irish bog. It is not uncommon to find preserved mummies in bogs, but this one is unique; scientists believe that the mummified body now called “Cashel man” was a member of an ancient royalty who fell victim to ritual sacrifice, …

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Neanderthals are Smarter than We Thought

The term “Neanderthal” is quickly going out of style as a derogatory term to describing a simpler person: researchers and archaeologists have uncovered evidence that European Neanderthals were making bone tools thousands of years before the arrival of the modern humans who researchers previously believed were the origins of this knowledge. The Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences presented …

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Mayan Frieze Discovered in Guatemala

The AP reports that Guatemalan archaeologist Francisco Estrada-Belli of Tulane University’s Anthropology department has discovered a wonderful site in northern Guatemala: a beautiful frieze that dates to the Mayan classical era. Although it was found in July, the Guatemalan government released the information on Wednesday. The artifact, a high-relief stucco, is about 26 ft tall by 6 ft wide, and …

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‘Gate to Hell’ in Turkey Could be the Famed Pluto’s Gate

Though not as fiery as the Google Maps “gate to hell” spotted earlier this year, Italian scientists believe they may have found the famed “gate to hell” known as Pluto’s Gate. The site was believed to have been built on top of a cave that emits toxic gas, which was believed by the Greeks and Romans to be the entrance …

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600-Year-Old Coin Found on Kenyan Island

A team of archaeologists has found a 600-year-old Chinese coin that was buried on the Kenyan island of Manda. Researchers say the find proves China and Africa were trading before European countries began their expansion across the globe. “This finding is significant,” said Chapurukha Kusimba, co-leader of the expedition and curator of African anthropology at The Field Museum. “We know …

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