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Report: Google Planning “Aggressive” Pursuit Of AOL Deal

Google may not wave Microsoft through

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Last month, we learned that AOL’s CEO, ex-Googler Tim Armstrong, doesn’t intend to blindly renew AOL’s search deal with Google when it expires in December.  Google doesn’t appear ready to stand back and let Microsoft or some other company take its place, however.

Nicholas Carlson spoke to an unnamed source "close to Mountain View’s headquarters," and this person indicated that the deal’s considered to be of some importance.  "Googlers are talking about plans to be to be ‘aggressive’ during negotiations," Carlson wrote.

Since the latest comScore numbers put AOL’s share of the search market at 2.6 percent, that may come as something of a surprise.  A mere 2.6 percent can’t mean a whole lot to Google, which controls a share about 25 times that size (65.7 percent of the market, to be exact).

Still, a partnership with AOL represents an easy way for a search company to spread its tech, and since AOL users are older and perhaps hard to reach online (according to stereotypes, at least), Google may be all right cracking open its wallet a ways.

For reference’s sake: Google has a market cap of $169.11 billion.  AOL’s market cap is closer to $2.5 billion.

Related Articles:

> AOL Hires Google, Microsoft Veteran As Head Of Tech

> AOL Acquires Video Creation/Distribution Company StudioNow

> AOL Top Ad Network In December

Report: Google Planning “Aggressive” Pursuit Of AOL Deal
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  • Dennis Clarkson

    I’m one of the “older” AOL users and have been at times very frustrated with AOL. Recently I’ve noticed some improvements. However I would welcome Google buying AOL. The many tools that Google offers to anyone with a website is amazing. I’m just beginning to understand how it all works.

  • http://www.controldatainc.com agency collection

    Why would Google want AOl so badly. At one time AOl was a leader but I doubt that they still have that type of edge in todays market

  • Nick The Photo Guy

    I’ve been using AOL since roughly 1997, back when it was the easiest to use Internet solution out there. Although in the past few years I will agree that AOL’s losing some of its relevance. When you can easily check your AOL mail or any other email for that matter on a portable device (ie an iPod touch, iPhone, Android OS powered phone, and probably most pre-paid plan phones too) and with the drop in price on private webhosting and cheap domains. People don’t really “need” something like AOL. And since they made it free, while wonderful for those of us who used to pay $23.95 a month for the service, and since their days as an actual ISP are numbered with the prevalence of cheap broadband service, wireless networks, and cheap or free WiFi, “dialing in” is as dead as the floppy disk.

    Now what I’ve always thought would be killer is if Google could basically amp up AOL’s tools. I still consider AOL Mail one of the best and safest mail readers out there. The browser, I barely use anymore since I run Google Chrome. For Instant Messenging most of my friends have moved over to Yahoo Messenger. Which is kind of funny because for years we thought YIM sucked and AIM was the best. Especially once they improved the chat features, added in file transfer and some more personalization although archiving would still be nice to have in the AOL “classic” software.

    I’ve had my AOL e-mail address for over a decade, that’s one of the primary reasons I stick with them, its just everywhere and its secure, always works and I’ve never “lost” messages or had it “go down” EVER. In over 13 years of using the service I have rarely had an outage. Not many services can say that. And YES I know about the infamous AOL outage from over a decade ago, but think about in 10 years – over 10 years – they haven’t had a hiccup like that. Just something to think about.