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Ocarina Of Time Completed In Less Than 25 Minutes Thanks To Exploit

An exploit 14 years in the making

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Exploits and bugs are sometimes a marvelous thing. They allow the player to access areas before they should be allowed to or just create all kinds of goofy problems with character animations or the geography. Sometimes an exploit is so rare or hard to find that it takes players over a decade to find – this is one of those exploits.

A YouTube user by the name of ZeldaFreaksGlitcha has used a recently found exploit to complete the seminal Nintendo 64 classic Ocarina of Time in less than 25 minutes. Let’s put that into perspective here: It took me over 30 hours to beat Ocarina of Time when I first played it years ago. I have tried to do speed runs before and it still took me about 15 hours to get through the entire game.

I’m sure many of you are wondering how a massive game like Ocarina of Time can even be completed in that time without the use of cheats. This is where the exploit comes in. If you fight the boss of the Deku Tree, Queen Gohma, in such a way that kills Link as soon as Queen Gohma dies, you can use an exploit that transports Child Link to the end of the game right as Ganondorf dies.

It’s an impressive feat and made all the more impressive by the fact that it took gamers over a decade to find it. Just to clarify, this is a legitimate exploit with the player not using any kind of cheat. This means that you can go bust out that copy of Ocarina of Time and try it for yourself.

If you don’t want to watch the entire 25-minute run, just skip to the end to watch the hilarious fight between Child Link and Ganon. Nothing is better than watching Link kill Ganon with a Deku Stick.

[h/t: Kotaku]

Ocarina Of Time Completed In Less Than 25 Minutes Thanks To Exploit


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  • http://www.technodo.com Andrew

    Wow, that Deku stick really packs a punch!

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