Memory Loss Prevention May Be Just One Bite Of Chocolate Away

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Memory loss is a condition that is both terrifying and tragic.

For far too many individuals, memory problems grow worse with time.

For those who suffer from dementia or Alzheimer's disease, memory loss can be particularly bad.

For years, scientists have been working to reverse memory loss.

Now there are claims that a much-beloved food may not only prevent the loss of memory, but reverse it as well.

According to the results of a recent study, a special cocoa concoction helped improve the memory of subjects substantially over a period of time.

Their brain function was said to be comparable to individuals in their 30s or 40s.

However, before you run down to the nearest supermarket and buy the store's entire supply of chocolate candy, there is something you should know.

The subjects were given a high-flavonol cocoa drink to consume, since the flavonols are what play a part in helping to improve overall memory function.

Unfortunately for us, the levels are not what is typically found in your average candy bar.

"This [memory loss study] really not about chocolate," said Dr. Scott Small. "It would be detrimental to one's health to try and run out and get flavonols from chocolate, which exist in chocolate, but in minuscule amounts."

Small is the director of the Alzheimer's Disease Research Center with the Taub Institute at the Columbia University Medical Center in New York City. He is also the co-author of this groundbreaking study.

Thirty-seven healthy subjects between the ages of 50 and 69 were tested to see how they would respond to a flavonol-rich diet. Those who were given more of this substance in their diet showed greatly improved memory functions.

"What is interesting here," said Small, "is that this is the first study to show a causal connection between a specific area of the brain and age-related memory loss."

In other words, it's possible for healthy adults to improve their memory and maybe even protect themselves from age-related memory loss by eating a diet rich in flavonols.

Though there are various foods that contain it, it would probably be more attractive to members of the public if they can eat a great deal of chocolate in order to reverse memory loss.

Though we aren't there yet, perhaps this will represent a sweet incentive to promote future memory loss research.