LeBron James’ Bad Night Inspires Twitter Backlash

    June 8, 2011

Game Four of the NBA Finals wound up being a no good, very bad evening for the once and future King of the NBA, LeBron James. After scoring a career-playoff low eight points in the Miami Heat’s loss to the Dallas Mavericks, fresh off the heels of Greg Doyel’s “LeBron Shrinks in the Fourth Quarter” blast, the criticism is starting to snowball into something even bigger Dirk Nowitzki’s recent “NoRingski” trend.

Alas, Nowitzki’s trend didn’t stay in the Twitter Trends top three for the entirety of the following day. Meanwhile,#lebronhairlinethemesong is still holding strong, something this recent screenshot demonstrates quite well:

LeBron trend

LeBron’s hairline has been the subject of much scrutiny as his headbands go higher and higher on his forehead. The Basketball Jones blog has a great demonstration of the phenomenon that is LeBron’s receding headband. As for the Twitter crowd, after such a non-LeBron-like performance against the Mavericks, they were particularly liberal with their commentary. Of course, when you consider just how polarizing of a figure James has become, thanks in large part to last summer’s “The Decision,” it’s no surprise the Internet greets him with such invectives.

Some highlights, which, aside from the pass to wade, was more than LeBron offered against the Mavericks:

#lebronhairlinethemesong En vogue “Never gonna get it”less than a minute ago via web Favorite Retweet Reply

This went on for hours and hours, as the upcoming time stamps demonstrate:

Twitter wasn’t the only place LeBron’s plight was enjoyed, either. The aforementioned Basketball Jones had some fun with James and his ability to flop at will.

But it’s the following content that captures the mood of the Internet in relation to LeBron James — as of the end of Game Four, anyway:

Lakers Nation says:
These kind of plays cause 10 times more damage to Lebron’s rep than any quadruple double he’ll ever get . . .

Keep in mind, all of this stems from James having a less-than-LeBron type of game, which factored significantly in the Heat’s loss. While Nowitzki’s trend was humorous, the current one concerning LeBron goes beyond basketball. Apparently, people really want to see King James fail, and if he has anymore outings like Game Four, they may very well get their wish. If that day happens, it wouldn’t be surprising if Twitter melted in the same manner that Landon Donovan’s World Cup goal caused.

Sadly, while he was certainly the catalyst, so far, LeBron has nothing to contribute to the trend.