Jessica Chambers' Mother Speaks Out After Daughter Was Set on Fire, Killing Her

Pam WrightLife

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Jessica Chambers' mother spoke out Thursday about the tragic death of her daughter, who was set on fire by someone on Saturday, killing her.

The 19-year-old former cheerleader was doused with a flammable liquid and set on fire, authorities said. She later died from her injuries. Police investigating the alleged murder are reconstructing the last few hours of her life and have asked residents for help with any information that will lead them to her killer.

According to her friends and family, the former softball player recently started a new job and was planning on beginning a college career next year.

Lisa Chambers said her daughter was a very playful young woman, who smiled all the time and had an adorable habit of playfully sticking her tongue out.

"She loved life, she loved everybody," her mother told The Associated Press. "She would do a monster face and stick her tongue out ... She's done that since she was about three years old."

Lisa thinks her daughter's outgoing personality may have had something to do with her death.

"She didn't think anybody could harm her or would want to," she said.

Lisa said she spoke to her daughter about an hour before her death.

"She was like, 'I'm cleaning out my car and I'm going to go get something to eat and be home to clean my room up,'" her mother said.

Jessica Chambers' friend, Ali Fadhel, who worked at the gas station where the teen was last seen, said his friend stopped by often to talk.

Fadhel told AP she came by on Saturday wearing a sweater and pajama pants. He said she stopped to talk with someone before entering the store to pay for gas. After pumping the gas, she re-entered the store, bought cigarettes, took a phone call on her way out and drove away.

According to Fadhel, she said she was going to make a stop before going home.

"If she knew she had a problem with somebody, she would have told me," Fadhel said.

Lisa, who had already bought her daughter's Christmas presents, said the door of her daughter's bedroom has been locked and no one will be allowed in.

"I feel her here. She's not at ease," Lisa Chambers said. "When she gets her justice, then she'll be at ease."

Pam Wright