Hump Day Commercial – It Isn’t For Everyone

    October 5, 2013

Geico has some pretty catchy commercials, and one of their newest includes a camel who chants “hump day” as he walks around an office. While most people find this commercial and play on words funny and entertaining, there are those who find it offensive and annoying. But what is so offensive about a camel who says “hump day?”

“Hump day” is an English language idiom for Wednesday and a reference to making it through the middle of the work week as getting “over the hump”. It is a popular phrase that has been around for years, but the recent Geico commercial seems to have refreshed everyone’s memory of the phrase. People and especially teenagers are using the term in various situations just to get a laugh. While this may seem harmless, many schools are considering banning the phrase and one already has.

Vernon Center Middle School faculty members said that kids were using the phrase for every day of the week and that it was starting to distract students in the hallways and during class. They have banned the use of the phrase and even started sending students to the principal’s office for using it. Many parents are also upset because they believe the phrase could have a sexual meaning.

The creators of the Hump Day commercial insist that it is all in fun and are happy with its success. The Martin Agency, the company who created the ad said they were looking for something that would be catchy yet surprising when they came up with the concept for the commercial.

“We were sort of focused on, let’s do something in the office, let’s do something you know that’s surprising.” “And I think I said camel, and then it just kind of went from there,” said Sean Riley, a creative director at the agency.

The Hump Day commercial is the most shared commercial of the summer and will likely become the most watched commercial of the year. So whether you like it or not, you might as well get used to it because it looks like it’s here to stay. At least for a while.

Image from Wikimedia Commons.