Home Security Systems: It’s All Good ‘Til It’s Hacked

    December 29, 2013

Home security systems have been flooding the news lately. With the Top Home Security Systems website naming FrontPoint Security once again the #1 system based on it’s great customer service and their use of the latest technology to battle against home invasion, it’s hard to remember a time where the only thing homeowners had to ward off crime was to keep their windows and doors locked.

But a lot has changed and now where have dozens of company competing and the ability to one-up each other is becoming harder by the day. We are bombarded with the latest videos, motion sensors, interactive and 24/7 customer service. Even with all that, are we truly safe from invasion, or we giving hackers and surveillance’s easier access into our homes?

According to a press release on PRWeb.com, there are about 2 million home burglaries reported each year. Companies took it upon themselves to lead the fight against this crime but some people are afraid that that kind of wireless access could make a family the center of unwanted attention.

Let’s look at it from a current affairs view: America has found out the their privacy has been seriously violated by the people who promise to protect us. Millions of shoppers were thrown into a state of shock when they found out there was a security breach at all Target stores putting their finances in danger. Two people at two completely different airports gained access to the tarmacs without getting caught initially. Are we truly safe from a breach in our home privacy?

Over the last couple of years there have been complaints of privacy invasions including using there own cameras to gain visual access and the ability to lock and unlock doors. While we praise technology for its advances, we cannot dismiss the fact the when technology fails us, it can be detrimental and sometimes deadly.

But that fear does not seem to stop companies for obtaining revenue for its home security systems. It seems that the thought of coming home to a emptied house superceeds the thought of someone having access to watching your every move

Imagery via Wikimedia Commons