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Facebook Blocks More Ad Networks

Facebook Highlights Efforts on Disabling Deceptive Ads

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Back in July Facebook updated policies for third-party ads on Facebook Platform. The company disabled two entire ad networks and over 100 more apps were suspended or brought into compliance over ad-related violations. Half of those had over a million monthly active users.

Facebook has now disabled two more offer and ad networks, which the company says have repeatedly violated its policies. This has all been part of Facebook’s continued action against deceptive ads. The company has addressed its efforts in this area on the company’s developer blog.

Nick Gianos"First, deceptive ads are a widespread issue on the Web and one we fight aggressively," says Facebook’s Nick Gianos. "This battle is not new and it’s far from over. We faced stimulus scam ads on our own system earlier this year and pushed them off the site with rigorous enforcement. We did the same months later when deceptive ads from third-party ad networks appeared in applications. We’re doing that again now as we see them appear in the form of offers."

"We recognize that monitoring ads isn’t the first area of focus for an entrepreneur just getting started with social applications," he says. "That’s why ad networks that don’t play by the rules should expect to be our first point of contact in our line of enforcement. Our policies are clear. If you’re an ad network and don’t comply with them, you are doing a disservice to your customers, and you should expect your business opportunities on Facebook to cease."

The company emphasizes that it is the responsibility not only of ad networks, but also of developers to make sure content running in third-party apps is appropriate.

Facebook’s policies on offers and "inappropriate" ad content can be viewed here. If there are questions, which there no doubt will be, they can be sent to Facebook via the Platform Advertising Contact form.

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Facebook Blocks More Ad Networks
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  • http://philosophy.net.magnamentis.com magnamentis

    First they come out of nothing by feeling and serving the pulse of time and the pulse of the masses, who are the average people. Then they start thinking to kick out the greatest offenders and reacht their peak before they are loosing the pulse, first of the masses who are not perfect and then of the time because time is travelling eternally. Nothing wrong with that but who wants to remain on top in mass-market should not forget that it’s the freaky non-conformist who made first their success happen and it has to be considered carefully how far they wanna please those who will never be pleased because they are not pleased with themselves and their own lives and need a valve. I wish to all the big players with good products wisdom and good judgement where improvement and clean-ups turn into downward spiral.

  • http://adscendmedia.com Jeremy

    And the two ad networks were?…

  • cgbutton

    Facebook is a social forum and should not have any advertising on the internet at all. If you went to a party how would you feel if somebody started to try and sell you toothpaste? Its just not the done thing at social gatherings. People go to a party to meet people and have fun. The last thing they want is to be distracted by advertising.

    ALL advertising on facebook is “deceptive”. Not jsut one or two adverts. Furthermore to advertsise on Facebook is nothing short of a waste of money. Facebook is the “deception” not the ad. FAcebook is a non-goal directed forum and as such nobody reads adverts on facebook and those that do are doing it only when distracted. The average time someone spends on a facebook advert is more often than not only less than a few seconds whereas a google or yahoo or MSN advert, or indeed any other goal directed forum, is usually over a minute.

    In short, facebook refuse to acknowledge that their users are not goal orientated and as such cannot possibly serve the advert Facebook are collecting money for. All serious business users should in my opinion avoid Facebook. Its the biggest marketing myth around right now.

    • http://ShopTRD.com jtr02a

      After using $250 of “Free” Ads on Facebook, I completely agree. My Bounce Rate were CRAZY and time on site was next to nothing. Total crap traffic. I promply discontinued use prior to the coupon reaching it’s full value and being billed for the nonsense. Good points.

  • http://www.facebook.com/socialmediatrailblazers Philippe Gadeyne

    I an glad to see that Facebook is finally taking a stand against the plethora of misleading advertisement on its network. Companies that constantly mislead the public have no place on social media, they pollute the network and create suspicion for the legitimate advertisers.
    Unfortunately these unethical companies have been pushed out of traditional marketing channel like telemarketing because of similar unsavory practices, or their spam is now blocked. They are looking for new venues and social network offered them a perfect environment. I am glad Facebook is taking a stand, they finally understood that they have more to lose than just advertising revenues.

    • cgbutton

      I think you miss the point.

      Its not so much that companies are misleading the public when they advertise on Facebook but much more the point that Facebook is misleading companies.

      Nobody reads a Facebook ad.

      Thats the point.

  • http://ShopTRD.com jtr02a

    I’m not sure what “The Perfect And The Average” comment is all about… over my head… but I’m happy Facebook is giving the boot the deceptive ads. Having crappy ads doesn’t just frustrate the consumer, it actually greatly impacts Facebook’s credability. When you only (or mostly) serve crap ads, your users will learn to simply ignore them. Take MSN/Google/Yahoo, for instance; they carefully vet all of their CPC ads prior to posting them to ensure that the content is not mis-directing. If you tell someone they can take an IQ test for FREE, and you’ll just shoot them a Text with the results, then you have a MASSIVE amount of fine print that, essentially, states the opposite and that you’ll be charged $100/mo for the rest of you life if you submit you cell number (billed via your phone bill), you’re going to get some very heated customers. Those customers at best will ignore any future ads from the source (Facebook) or at worst will dedicate their life to destroying Facebook for hosting an add that cost them a lot of money and time.

    Personally, if I see an ad for a company or website on Facebook, I think they are not legit b/c that is about all I’ve seen. Just my two cents on the subject.