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Cisco CCNP Exam: Defining Collision Domains

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CCNA exam success depends on mastering the fundamentals, and two important fundamentals are knowing exactly what the terms “collision domain” and “broadcast domain” mean.

In this free Cisco tutorial, we’ll take a look at the term “collision domain” and how a collision domain is defined.

A collision domain is an area in which a collision can occur. Fair enough, but what “collision” are we talking about here?

We’re talking about collisions that occur on CSMA/CD segments, or Carrier Sense Multiple Access with Collision Detection.

If two hosts on an Ethernet segment transmit data at exactly the same time, the data from the two hosts will collide on the shared segment.

CSMA/CD exists to lessen the chances of this happening, but collisions can still occur. To lessen the chances of collisions occurring, we may decide to create multiple, smaller collision domains.

Lets say we have four hosts on a single Ethernet segment. The entire segment is a collision domain; any data sent by one of the hosts can collide with data sent by any of the other hosts. We have one collision domain containing four devices.

To create smaller collision domains, we’ll need to introduce some type of networking device into this example.

Hubs and repeaters have their place as far as extending the reach of a network segment and cutting down on attenuation, but these OSI Layer One devices do nothing to define collision domains. We could connect each host into a separate port on a hub (a hub is basically a multiport repeater) and we’d still have one single collision domain with four hosts in it.

The most common and most effective way to create multiple collision domains is to use a switch.

If we connect each of these four hosts to their own separate switch port, we would now have four separate collision domains, each with one host; each switch port actually acts as a single collision domain, making collisions between these four hosts impossible.

Passing the CCNA is all about knowing the details of how things work, and knowing CSMA/CD theory and how to define collision domains is one of the many details youve got to master.

In the next part of this CCNA tutorial, we’ll take a look at broadcast domains, and how defining broadcast domains in the right places can dramatically cut down on unnecessary traffic on your network.

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Chris Bryant, CCIE #12933, is the owner of The Bryant Advantage (www.thebryantadvantage.com), home of FREE CCNA and CCNP tutorials and daily exam questions, as well as The Ultimate CCNA and CCNP Study Packages.

For a FREE copy of his latest e-books, “How To Pass The CCNA” or “How To Pass The CCNP”, and for free daily exam question, visit the website and download your copies!

Cisco CCNP Exam: Defining Collision Domains
About Chris Bryant
Chris Bryant, CCIE #12933, is the owner of The Bryant Advantage (www.thebryantadvantage.com), home of FREE CCNA and CCNP tutorials and daily exam questions, as well as The Ultimate CCNA and CCNP Study Packages.

For a FREE copy of his latest e-books, "How To Pass The CCNA" or "How To Pass The CCNP", and for free daily exam question, visit the website and download your copies! WebProNews Writer
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  • Guest

    Hi Chris,

    I understood the concept of collision domain in the hubs but i m confused in switches.

    As you mentioned that if a switch is having 4 ports and 4 hosts connected to each port then there will be 4 collision domain. But as one port is having only one host then for that port no collision should occur. Since there is no other host which can send the frames and can cause the collision.

    Therefore i am bit confused. Please get me rid out of this problem.

    Regards,

    Abhinav Gupta

     

  • Guest

    make it more easy to understand