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About Taran Rampersad

Located in Trinidad and Tobago, Taran Rampersad does international consultation work related to Software Development and related processes. He is also is a Free Software and Open Source (FOSS) advocate, and is a presenter at the FLOS Caribbean conference (http://www.floscaribbean.org). As a developer and writer, he is well informed on FOSS and its positive impact economically and philosophically, as well as in process. His website is http://www.knowprose.com.
Taran Rampersad Answers Software Process Management Questions

Practical and theoretical questions related to Software Process Management. These would be general questions; more specific questions would be answered in a vague manner. Consulting services available for more in depth analyses.

Taran Rampersad Answers Open Source Questions
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Practical and theoretical questions related to Software Process Management. These would be general questions; consulting services are available for more in depth analyses.

Software Project Manager Primer

Have you recently found yourself pushed into the role of project manager? Are you wondering what to do next? More and more often, IT professionals are finding themselves rather suddenly propelled into project management roles – and many don’t know where to begin. Well, there’s good and bad news – no one automatically knows how to manage a project. However, if you want to be successful at it, you have a substantial learning curve ahead of you.

Software Project Management Primer

Sooner or later, someone steps into your office and says, “You’re a project manager.” It’s that quick, it’s that unannounced. It’s as though it’s expected that, just by hearing those words, you’ll magically know what you’re supposed to do, how you’re supposed to do it, and when things are supposed to get done. If you’re very lucky, you’ll increase your salary. If you’re like most, you won’t.

Beyond BASIC: SheerPower 4GL

There are so many programming languages out there, it’s almost impossible to count them without digital help – and that’s not a reference to fingers. A quick browse in a bookstore can easily overwhelm even an intermediate programmer.

When a new language comes out, it’s a difficult birthing process. The language must take its first breaths in full public view, amongst cynics and idealists. This is a trying period; there are competing languages already out there and in use, and it’s difficult for a new language to find a place. All too often, YAPLs (Yet Another Programming Language) are released and dwindle into nothingness.