Quantcast
20
Posts
1
Comments

About Steve Kaye

IAF Certified Professional Facilitator and author Steve Kaye works with leaders who want to hold effective meeting. His innovative workshops have informed and inspired people nationwide. His facilitation produces results that people will support. Call 714-528-1300 or visit his web site for over 100 pages of valuable ideas. Sign up for his free newsletter at http://www.stevekaye.com
10 Attributes of Effective Meetings

Here are ten ideas that characterize an effective meeting.

Come Home Rich – How to Get the Most out of Your Next Conference

Success in your career depends upon how well you manage your professional development. A prime source of this development comes from being a member of a professional association that relates to your career. As a member, you can attend conferences where you advance your skills and meet people who can help you.

How to Save Money on Training

1) Use a live instructor. Adults learn best by doing, practicing, and experiencing. Effective instructors customize their programs to meet people’s needs, provide counsel on individual challenges, and respond to questions. Videos, CDs, and E-learning are seldom effective for primary learning.

Why Would Anyone Do That in My Meeting?

Imagine that you open a meeting by saying, “We need to talk about the budget.”

Monsters in Meetings – Multiple Conversations

Side conversations ruin meetings by destroying focus and fragmenting participation.

How to Hold Effective Staff Meetings
· 1

Many people believe that they conduct effective meetings, when all they really do is host a party. Or worse, they deliver a monologue. In either case, their meetings produce little.

Monsters in Meetings – How to Manage Unproductive Behavior

It happens easily. You’re conducting a meeting and suddenly a small side meeting starts. Then someone introduces an unrelated issue. Someone else ridicules the new issue. Everyone laughs, except the person who mentioned the idea. Then someone insults the person who told the joke. Two people stand up and walk out. Others complain that the meeting is a waste of time.

Monsters in Meetings – Deadlocked Discussions

You thought you had an effective meeting until one participant disagreed with everyone else. Then others took sides. Now the meeting is deadlocked. Here’s what to do.

Monsters in Meetings – Personal Attacks

Personal attacks hurt people, mar communication, and end creativity. If they become part of a meeting’s culture, they drive the participants into making safe and perhaps useless contributions.

Ten Tips for Effective Meetings

Here are ten things that you can do to hold more effective meetings.

Monsters in Meetings – Dominant Participants

While dominant participants contribute significantly to the success of a meeting, they can also overwhelm, intimidate, and exclude others. Thus, you want to control their energy without losing their support.

Monsters in Meetings – Drifting From the Topic

Although new ideas lead to creative solutions, they can be a challenge when they interrupt or distract the work on an issue.

Why Training Fails

Sometimes when I conduct my workshop on Effective Meetings, one of the participants will ask, “Where’s my boss?”

Monsters in Meetings – Quiet Participants

There are many reasons why someone would decline to participate during a meeting. For example, the person may feel reluctant to speak out, may disagree with the approach endorsed by others in the meeting, or may just be tired.

Effective Meetings Begin With a Real Agenda

Everyone knows that an agenda is the key to an effective meeting. But an agenda that consists of a list of nouns, such as budget, software, and picnic, is useless. Here’s how to prepare a real agenda that puts you in control of the meeting.

7 Myths That Make Meetings Miserable

You can hold effective meetings and become a more successful leader if you avoid these seven monsters. Here’s how.

Effective Meetings Have a Complete Agenda

Most agendas for a meeting look like this.

Effective Meetings Have SMART Goals

The first step in planning an agenda is to identify the goals for the meeting. Properly done, goals have five S M A R T characteristics. They are:

Effective Meetings Begin With a Goal

Goals are critically important for the success of a meeting. You must know what you want so you can ask for it. And the participants need to know what you want so they can help you get it. Without goals, a meeting becomes a journey without a destination.

Effective Meetings Earn a Profit

Most people treat meetings as a free resource that can be used to deal with any issue. As a result, huge amounts of time and money are wasted on trivia.