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About Rusty Cawley

Rusty Cawley is a 20-year veteran journalist who now coaches executives, professionals and entrepreneurs on news strategy. He is the author of PR Rainmaker: Three Simple Rules for Using the News Media to Attract New Customers and Clients, available at amazon.com. To learn more about PR Rainmaking, visit http://www.prrainmaker.com/dailyblog.html.
Three Steps to Preventing a Media Attack

The best method for handling a media crisis is to assume one will happen to you in the future, and get ready for it now.

Unfortunately, you cannot begin to predict exactly what will happen and when. But you can take some all-purpose steps to provide yourself some protection.

Let Yourself Be Typecast

In 1930, Hollywood actor Bela Lugosi turned down an offer to play the Monster in “Frankenstein.” This happened just after Lugosi scored a huge box office hit as Count Dracula.

A European-trained stage actor with experience as a romantic lead, Lugosi rejected the Frankenstein role because he didn’t want to be typecast as a star of horror movies.

The Two Cards You Need to Play PR

Poker will teach the PR Rainmaker more about human nature that just about any activity short of physical combat.

Greed versus fear. Risk versus reward. Truth versus deception. You can find it all in a late night session of Texas Hold ‘Em.

Aim Your Story at the National News Media

Begin at the bottom rung of the news media and work your way to the top. That’s the conventional wisdom most companies follow. PR specialists call this “building credibility.”

“We’ll begin with the trade publications and the small newspapers,” they say. “Once we build our credibility there, we can move up to the daily newspapers and to large-market television. And if we succeed there, maybe … just maybe … we can break in with the national media. This will take years of hard work, but we can get you there if you trust us and do as we say.”

Four Secrets to Energizing Your News Story

Every news story must have a FACE. If your forget to put a FACE on your story proposal, your chances of interesting a reporter are nil.

All true PR Rainmakers faithfully practice this fundamental every time they design a story proposal for the news media.

How to Sell Your News to Reporters
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If you want create a PR campaign that is effective and consistent, you must learn to market your story to the news media. You must learn to treat reporters as the customers who will either buy or reject your product: raw news.

Five Steps to Precision in Publicity

PR flacks use a scattergun approach, hoping to hit something. They fax out press releases to long lists of reporters and editors. They make countless, fruitless phone calls. They pester and cajole and plead.

Four Secrets to Creating Irresistible News Stories

Every news story must have a FACE. If you forget to put a FACE on your story proposal, your chances of interesting a reporter are nil.

All true PR Rainmakers practice this fundamental technique when they develop any story proposal they plan to market to the news media.

By FACE, the PR Rainmaker means:

How to Win a News Reporter’s Heart

Every have trouble convincing a news reporter to cover your story? Here’s how to solve that problem.

Like all other humans, reporters are subject to the Law of Reciprocity. When they receive cooperation, they will give cooperation. When they receive loyalty, they will give loyalty. When they receive gifts, they will give gifts.

How to Market Your News to Reporters

If you want create a PR campaign that is effective and consistent, you must learn to market your story to the news media. You must learn to treat reporters as the customers who will either buy or reject your product: raw news.