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About Jordan McCollum

Jordan McCollum is a staff writer for the popular marketing blog Marketing Pilgrim. She has worked in search engine optimization with clients including 3M, Little Giant Ladders and ADP. After graduating from Brigham Young University, Jordan joined the SEO copywriting team at the Internet marketing firm 10x Marketing. After 10x closed its doors in December 2006, Jordan became a freelance writer and Internet marketing consultant specializing in SEO. She also has extensive experience with web analytics, conversion rate enhancement and e-mail marketing.
Facebook Making Their Site Safer For Kids

It’s been nearly four months since MySpace announced a joint agreement with 49 state Attorneys General to protect minors online—and now Facebook’s finally gotten around to signing on. CNET reports (emphasis added):

NBC Back On YouTube

Back in October, NBC took its popular, officially-sanctioned clips off YouTube in favor of their coming Hulu. I (and many others) derided the decision:

[I]s it really wise to pull your content from the most popular video site online to put it on your own untested, unproven and apparently behind-schedule video site? On the Internet, you have to go where the people are—it’s not an ‘if you build it, they will come’ world anymore.

Court’s Ruling On Trademarked Keyword

It appears that US courts are getting more and more savvy about Internet marketing (or US attorneys are getting more and more savvy about their “expert” witnesses in these cases!).

eBay’s Lawsuit Against Craigslist

I know you’re getting bored with all the other Internet marketing intrigues out there, so here’s a new one: eBay is suing craigslist. Tantalizing, isn’t it?

Yahoo Testing AdSense for Search

In an announcement made just moments ago, Yahoo has formally decided to try a limited test of Google’s AdSense for Search program in their search results. From the release:

The test will apply only to traffic from yahoo.com in the U.S. and will not include Yahoo!’s extended network of affiliate or premium publisher partners. The test is expected to last up to two weeks and will be limited to no more than 3% of Yahoo! search queries.

Facebook And ConnectU Reach Settlement

As with most legal battles, the ConnectU suit against Facebook has begun to drag out: first filed in September 2004, the legal battle over who originally created the source code for Facebook is still ongoing. Last July, a Massachusetts Federal judge ruled that ConnectU needed concrete evidence to bring their suit.

Couple Suing Google Maps For Private Residence Pictures

We’ve heard all kinds of privacy concerns since Google Maps launched its Street View photos last May, most of which have had l

MySpace Launches iTunes Rival

MySpace announces that they will launch MySpace Music, a service to rival Apple’s popular iTunes music player and marketplace. Like iTunes, MySpace Music will feature streaming music, paid DRM-free MP3 downloads and music-related merchandise.

Mobile Marketing On The Rise?

Now here’s the kind of prediction that I like to hear: eMarketer’s John du Pre Gauntt says that “2007 was not ‘the year of mobile marketing’ that it was advertised to be, and 2008 won’t be either.” I don’t have anything against mobile marketing itself, I’m just tired of the hype. So a down-to-earth look at the future of mobile marketing is what I want.

eMarketer’s key points:

Facebook – Dying Or Not?

Admit it: you thought Facebook was the coolest thing since sliced bread (okay, CD/DVD-RW drives). You were so proud of yourself for joining long before Facebook became the media darling they are today.

And now you’re cheering for its demise with the rest of them. But you’ll have to hold off on the death watch for a little while longer.

Google Is Lobbying To Offer Free National Wifi

Free, nationwide WiFi. Drooling yet, or do I need to say it again? Free, nationwide WiFi from Google. As we mentioned earlier, Google is lobbying the FCC for some of the wireless spectrum that will be freed next year when television will cease analog transmission. Google’s plan? “Wi-Fi on steroids.” (Without the ‘roid rage, I’m guessing.)

Some Internet Users Can’t Find Google

This week, usability guru Jakob Nielsen asks: “How difficult is it to perform a search on Google?

No, really. How hard is it? We know the search box in the upper right hand corner of your screen can get there. We know that Google.com in the address bar can get there. But, sadly, Nielsen’s study indicated that at least 24% of Internet users don’t know that. It hurts me just to type it.

Problems With Facebook’s New Privacy Measures

As promised yesterday, Facebook has announced new privacy measures. The new features include long-sought for privacy controls based on friend lists (which were introduced in December).

Facebook Acquiring IM Service?

I take one weekend off the Internet, and everything goes crazy. Can’t you people get on without me?

The Internet Demographic

Do you feel that most content on the Internet is aimed at your age group?

Ask.com Shifts Their Focus

ask logoA few headlines have popped up today with the good news. I spoke with Ask.com spokesman and VP Nicholas Graham in a personal interview today to clarify Ask’s announcement earlier this week.

The idea that we’re going to become a ‘women’s site’ is not correct,” says Graham. Ask says that the original AP report had an erroneous headline, and it’s pretty much been downhill from there.

Google or MySpace to Grab Bebo?

TechCrunch speculates that there’s a 51% chance that Google might buy Bebo—or maybe MySpace will snap up the smaller social networking company.

Yahoo Lifecasting

Earlier this month, Jerry Yang introduced Yahoo’s pending social-mail integration as “Yahoo Life” (though the company later clarified that the product was, in fact, nameless).

But it looks like they’ll make sure the name, or something like unto it, goes to good use. Valleywag reports that Yahoo will launch a new “lifecasting” service called Yahoo Live.

WSJ Will Not Abandon Subscription Model

If rumors are to be believed, the Wall Street Journal has been considering abandoning the subscription model for months.

But alas, it’s not to be. Rupert Murdoch announced today that the Wall Street Journal, while expanding its free offerings, would not leave the subscription model. In fact, he stated that:

Is Internet Use in Your Home Public?

In the United States, we have some pretty easy-to-remember guidelines on what constitutes “public” and “private.”

Areas like your home and your car are considered private. With a few notable exceptions, other areas are public. These legal definitions apply to entities like the police and the press—anything that happens (or is found) in public is “fair game,” but to intrude on your privacy, the police have to have at least a reasonable suspicion of illegal activity (or your permission).

AskEraser Already Under Fire

Privacy watchdog groups have filed a complaint with the FTC about AskEraser, claiming that the six-week-old service doesn’t live up to its promises of erasing all user search data even when enabled.

Some Interesting Online Video Ad Stats

 As marketers, we hear people complain all the time about advertising. It comes as no surprise that BurstMedia’s recent survey found that people don’t like ads—but it’s probably something we should think about.

Google Goes Back Over Adsense Referral Program

Two weeks ago, Google announced some changes to their AdSense Referral Program.

Google & Facebook See European Trouble

Google and Facebook, sweethearts of the Internet who would never face legal challenges on this