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About Jordan McCollum

Jordan McCollum is a staff writer for the popular marketing blog Marketing Pilgrim. She has worked in search engine optimization with clients including 3M, Little Giant Ladders and ADP. After graduating from Brigham Young University, Jordan joined the SEO copywriting team at the Internet marketing firm 10x Marketing. After 10x closed its doors in December 2006, Jordan became a freelance writer and Internet marketing consultant specializing in SEO. She also has extensive experience with web analytics, conversion rate enhancement and e-mail marketing.
YouTube Relaxing Its Partnership Program Limits

This week, Google announced that YouTube is extending its Partnership Program.

Twitter Turns To Outside Sources For Advice On Own Service

Let’s say you own the most popular microblogging service on the Internet. Let’s say you want to grow that service and make it more valuable to your users (and maybe make money. You wouldn’t complain.). So you’re going to feature third party apps, but you want to feature the best ones.

Facebook Privacy Concerns Make Their Way To Canada

Facebook is gearing up to face off with the government again—this time over privacy concerns in two different venues: the California courts and a Canadian commission.

Will MicroPayments Work For The Financial Times?

Micropayments have worked for companies like iTunes and even Amazon.com for songs and television episodes. But could they be the solution to the newspaper industry’s pending demise?

The Financial Times is ready to find out. They currently use a hybrid paid-free model, where users can access up to 20 stories a month for free, but they’re looking to a pay-per-story or possibly subject or time period model.

DoS Attacks vs. Social Media

Maybe you heard the sound of the world crashing down and people actually being productive at work yesterday while Twitter was unreachable. It wasn’t long before the full explanation came out—the popular microblogging site was the victim of a DoS attack.

The Use Of Twitter By The Teen Demographic

Yeah, yeah, yeah—I’m sure we can all name some anecdotal evidence of teens who either hate Twitter or who can’t get off it. But by and large, according to a new Nielsen report, teens just aren’t on Twitter.

Or are they? The chart from the report looks at users on Twitter.com (as opposed to on phones or desktop clients):

Wall Street Journal’s Interesting Take On Embargoes

It’s been eight months since TechCrunch announced that they would no longer honor embargoes, with several other sites jumping on that bandwagon in the interim. One of the issues here was undermining the credibility of the blogosphere at large. As Trisha Lyn Fawver put it,

YouTube Bringing Local News To You, Traditional Outlets Cringe

YouTube has yet another new—or should I say news?—feature: News Near You.

3D Video Could Be Possibility In YouTube’s Future

Google is still letting its employees play with their 20% time, as evidenced by the newest YouTube project spotted: three dimensional video. Pete, the Googler behind this, confirmed this in a YouTube Help thread, saying that the project is “currently very early.”

youtube3d test from seroundtable

Pete says the current tags in the project are:

Facebook Dealing With a Click Fraud and Data Access Lawsuit

It’s a saga we’re all familiar with by now: create a pretty awesome web service, start a trend, become a media sweetheart, make lots of money (VC or acquisition), get slapped with a lawsuit. Or two. Or fifty billion. Facebook added two more lawsuits to its heap recently: a countersuit from Power.com and a click fraud proceeding.

Technorati Trying To Make A Comeback

How long has it been since we’ve heard about Technorati? When did you last visit the erstwhile-preeminent blog tracking site? And even then, didn’t you get the sense they were going downhill? While that may just be what happens to every media (or blog) sweetheart, Technorati has seen a decline. Many have attributed this to a lack of features, innovation, relevancy of results, etc. 

Twitter Definitions Become Sponsored

Back in March, Twitter gave us all a head-fake when they started posting “sponsored definitions,” definitions in a the sidebar of Twitter homepages that looked like ads. Twitter was quick to correct the assumption that they were, in fact, ads—they were only definitions, just like you get free from dictionaries.

Hulu Receives Good News Concerning Their Online Ad Format

paidContent has two pieces of good news for Hulu in the past week—they’re commanding not only similar ad prices to broadcast television, but also 10% of the online video ad market.

Facebook Status Updates Going Public

This week, Facebook announced some coming changes to your status updates. Soon, just like with Twitter, you’ll have the option to make them public—but not just to everyone on the world’s most popular social network, but everyone around the world. (You know, with Internet access.)

The Power Of Twitter

Two recent reports illustrate the power of Twitter in two important metrics—driving visits and purchasing power. Hitwise analyzes overall downstream traffic for Twitter, while NPD Group takes a look at downstream purchases generated by Twitter.

Within A Year, Facebook Triples Its Advertiser Base

I know you’re tired of hearing the same old “the economy is going down the tubes” sob story, so I brought you something different today—a company that’s actually increasing its advertiser base. And not just any company—a social media company (and you know how tough it is to really make money there—you know, other thank from VCs).

Wikipedia Adding Video By End Of The Summer

Okay, no, not really—but the encyclopedia anyone can edit is looking to add video to its offerings, according to Technology Review (via RWW).

YouTube Financial Woes Aren’t As Bad As First Indicated

Back in April, Credit Suisse issued a report stating that YouTube stood to lose $470M this year. But now it looks like the financial services company was overly pessimistic (and, really, they’re probably just used to that, with the economy the way it is). New estimates from research company RampRate puts the losses for the most popular video website in the world far more conservatively:

Blogs or Mainstream News, Where’s The Real Information?

I know what you’ve been thinking: man, I’m tired of reading unfounded rumors reported as news. Yeah, me too. Really, I am. So let’s fix this. Let’s stop reading blogs—I mean, you know all they do is just post anything that comes into their heads, foundation or not—and stick to the venerable guardians of all truth, the mainstream media.

Jonathan Miller Of News Corps Hints At Charging For Hulu

The aliens over at Hulu don’t just want to eat your brains—they also want to take your money, according to a Daily Finance story yesterday. New CEO Jonathan Miller said:

he envisions a future where at least some of the TV shows and movies on Hulu, the premium video site co-owned by News Corp., NBC Universal and Disney, are available only to subscribers.

YouTube XL Invading Televisions With ‘XL’ Content

YouTube is finally preparing to take on Hulu with premium content and better quality video from YouTube XL—preparing for a real big screen interface. You know, such as a television. Hulu is rather adamant about not going to television, so this could get to be a bit of a big deal.

Google To Throw Its Hat In The eBook Arena

Google’s been slowly edging its way into the book business for a good long while now. First Google Book Search, then a deal to show books still in copyright—and now they’re getting ready to take on Amazon in the eBook department.

Murdoch Takes Back Free News Deal

 

Social Media Marketing And The FTC