Alyssa Milano and Others Talk About Fat-Shaming

    January 8, 2014

In an interview with Mario Lopez, on the show “Extra,” actress Alyssa Milano spoke about Jay Mohr’s now infamous comments, when he called her fat during an awards show. Sadly, Milano heard about the comments on Dec. 25., which must of surely put a damper on her day.

“I heard it actually on Christmas Day and it hurt me,” she said. “I was affected by it and I wanted to remind him that I’m a human being and that this hurts.” In addition, the gorgeous brunette said that she’s on her way to losing the rest of her pregnancy weight. “I gained 55 pounds when I was pregnant. I still have 10 more to lose,” she explained.

By now most people are familiar with the story of Mohr calling Milano fat, then Milano responding through Twitter and Mohr eventually apologizing. And of course it would have been easy for the former “Charmed” star to ignore the comments, but she felt she just had to say something.

“He made a comment that was not so nice about my weight and I called him out on Twitter about it,” she said. “I just think he was trying to make a joke and not think about it. I think it’s an interesting statement about where we are socially that people feel that they can sort of rip a woman’s body apart after having a baby. I don’t think it’s fair.”

Milano’s frustration seems to mirror that of actor Jennifer Lawrence, who also talked about how cruel people can be to woman nowadays. In an interview with Barbara Walters last month she said that fat-shaming has become the popular joke of the day and that it really needs to stop.

“Why is humiliating people funny,?” she asked Walters. “I get it and I do it too, we all do it. But I think when it comes to the media, the media needs to take responsibility for the effect that it has on our generation, on these girls that are watching these television shows and picking up how to talk and how to be cool. So then all of a sudden, being funny is making fun of the girl that’s wearing an ugly dress.”

Hopefully, shaming people is one of those trends in our culture that will soon begin to subside a bit, but with social media almost replacing human interaction in terms of communication, some may say think that things will get worse before they get better. And who’s to say things will get better at all? It might not.

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